Kiwi tech company raises millions for expansion

Kiwi technology company Feijipiao is expanding across New Zealand and eyeing other markets after closing a multi-million dollar angel investment round.

The company, founded in 2016 by Peter Li, is a Chinese language online travel business, offering flight bookings across multiple airlines in Chinese.

The website offers competitive fares and multiple payment solutions, in either Chinese yuan or New Zealand dollars, through automated search, booking, and ticketing processes.

The investment was headed by The Icehouse and Chinese-led angel fund Eden Ventures – its first investment.

Led by Chinese venture capitalists and entrepreneurs, Eden Ventures focuses on high performing start-ups, with specific interest in serving Chinese in New Zealand or enabling New Zealand founders to launch into the Chinese market.

The funding values Feijipiao at between $5 million and $10m, and would be used to hire staff, open its first New Zealand office in Auckland and fund further growth, as well as prepare the business for expansion into Australia and other markets.

The company was already bringing in revenue of about $900,000 per month, with Li saying he expected this to hit $1m in the coming few months.

Icehouse fund manager Jason Wang said both groups had invested based on Feijipiao’s growth in the five months since it launched, as well as the potential they saw for it.

“In three months, feijipiao.co.nz have transacted millions of dollars without a physical office, it’s all in the cloud.

“The results speak for themselves – this is a group of the right people doing the right thing in the right market.”

The company’s success had been helped by millennials influencing the purchasing behaviours of their parents, who tended to use more traditional travel agents Li said.

The investment would enable the company to continue its expansion as well as providing strategic value for the firm.

“Our team has built a strong foundation in New Zealand to prepare ourselves for expansion into global markets with established Chinese communities, and international students from China.

“By partnering with Eden Ventures and The Icehouse, we can tap into their expertise of forming long-term growth strategies for global expansion, and supporting technology driven companies.”

First published on nzherald.co.nz on 15 Sept 2017

Please follow and like us:

2017 Angel Summit focuses on next 10 years

The tenth Annual New Zealand Angel Summit will be held at Cable Bay Winery – Waiheke Island from 1 – 3 November 2017. It’s theme; “Doubling down on success… the next ten years!”

New Zealand is now decade in to formal angel investing in New Zealand and has amassed some impressive statistics for a nation of our size. Over $500m into nearly 1000 deals in the more formal part of our market. Ten years ago there were 4 clubs and 100 or so angels. Today there are 10 clubs and over 650 angels. All this activity has delivered hundreds of jobs and tens of millions of revenue. It’s this value creation we want to continue to accelerate.

Ten years ago there were 4 clubs and 100 or so angels. Today there are 10 clubs and over 650 angels. All this activity has delivered hundreds of jobs and tens of millions of revenue. It’s this value creation we want to continue to accelerate.

The 10th Annual NZ Angel Summit is being held back where it all started at Cable Bay Winery on Waiheke Island. The choice of the small intimate venue continues the deliberate approach by the Angel Association to ensure it creates the right atmosphere for relaxed and informal conversations between active angel investors. The last two summits have sold out and it unapologetically prioritises attendance for those who are ‘doing deals’.

On the first morning the Summit will celebrate our community of investors and founders and their achievements in the past decade. There is so much to be proud of. The rest of the event will be spent digging into what we need to do to double down on our successes based on stories and insights from New Zealand’s heroes. International speakers, carefully vetted for their ability to both understand New Zealand’s unique circumstances and our aspiration for outcomes and success are flying in to present.

Showcasing Angel Investor Backed Ventures

The Showcase event which kicks off the event will include up to 10 venture in three tiers; seed, first formal round, last raise with a clear exit path. Each group of ventures will be introduced by an experienced angel investor who will talk about the investment opportunity, the return profile, valuations and potential acquirers.

New Zealand Investor Keynotes

Key Note sessions will include deep insight into what we can be proud of and what’s next. Stalwart investors will share memories of getting started – what was their vision and what inspired them, their challenges and what we need to do in the next decade to ensure value is delivered. These sessions will explore why our environment looked as it did 10 years ago, how far we’ve come and how we build on what we’ve created and set the vision for the next 10 years.

International Angel Investors

International special guests include Justin Milano (Good Startups, San Francisco, USA) who will explore the role of fear in the early-stage space. A veteran of Silicon Valley, Mr Milano has worked with angels and entrepreneurs to use cutting edge psychology and neuroscience, including emotional intelligence skills to help entrepreneurs and angels create break-throughs and unlock potential. Ron Wiessman (Band of Angels, San Francisco, US) will deliver a dose of reality exploring the critical the role of capital strategy and how tough it can be to source and entice an acquirers.

Actionable Insights

The extensive programme includes gritty content which covers; building strategic value, actively managing your portfolio for returns, Government’s role – identifying the right policy levers, the role of NZ corporate venture, and deep dives into term sheets – how have they have evolved and what role do they play in venture success lead by AANZ Expert Partner, Avid Legal’s Bruno Bordignon. Insight into which industries and technologies are going to irrevocably disrupt markets in the coming decades and make the best investment opportunities round out the valuable programme.

Finally, the event will also include the presentation of Arch Angel Award and two inaugural awards “Contribution to the industry” and “Lead angel and best venture award” – celebrating a great angel/founder collaboration.

To book your seat (preference is given to active angel investors) click here.

Please follow and like us:

Kiwi startup Hydroxsys could help clean up NZ’s waterways

Hydroxsys is a clean-tech company founded on unique water extraction technologies aimed at mining, dairy and other industries requiring water extraction or remediation.

The company has acquired an experienced management team focused on developing the company’s IP and bringing revolutionary products to market.

NZ food network has thrown in their lot with Hydroxsys and is helping the company develop their revolutionary technologies.

Read more

Please follow and like us:

Capital Markets Report: Face the fear of missing out

New Zealand companies often have to look offshore to access the funds and networks they need to scale internationally. Two of them, Booktrack and Vend, have attracted much-needed capital. James Penn asked their founders about the state of international investment for high-growth Kiwi companies.
Aucklander Paul Cameron founded Booktrack along with his brother Mark Cameron in 2011. Booktrack’s technology allows soundtracks to be added to e-books to create an immersive reading experience.
Since launching they have secured investment from some of Silicon Valley’s most high profile figures, including PayPal co-founder Peter Thiel, and Mark D’Arcy, a Vice-President at Facebook.
Vaughan Rowsell is the founder of Vend, a rapidly-growing retail software company. Thiel has also invested in Rowsell’s company, and in December Vend raised $13 million in capital to fund their international growth. That raising included investors such as Square Peg Capital, Movac, and Sam Morgan’s Jasmine Investments.
Herald: When you sought capital investment in the United States, what were the drivers of that decision?
Paul Cameron: To help build networks in our target market.
Local investors opened up their networks to us and this enabled Booktrack to accelerate our business in the United States.
Vaughan Rowsell: As a SaaS (software as a service) company with a global footprint, we looked to the United States for capital, in particular Silicon Valley, because there is a deep capital pool looking to fund exactly our profile of business. We spoke to many Silicon Valley venture capitalists and ended up being funded by the overseas investment arm of one of the great Valley investors, Valar Ventures, which actively looked for New Zealand businesses to fund.
Herald: What challenges have you faced when raising capital in the United States as a New Zealand company?
Vaughan Rowsell: The biggest challenge is that United States venture capitalists (VCs) are not used to working with the risk profile of New Zealand companies — we are a 12-hour flight away, speak differently, have a non-American culture towards sales and marketing, and an alien legal structure to the companies they are used to investing in.
United States-based VCs rarely deviate from their hypothesis on what a great business for funding looks like, which is formed with United States-based companies in mind. When you have geography, culture, a new legal system and other things in the mix, and it comes down to comparing apples with apples, New Zealand companies have a bigger hill to climb.
I don’t mean to say it doesn’t happen or won’t happen, it’s just a system that is harder for us.
If you are willing to be United States headquartered or have a United States executive team, I am sure it would be different. For us, staying Kiwi has always been important so we have secured investment from outside of the United States.
Paul Cameron: Investing in a New Zealand entity can be challenging for a United States investor as New Zealand is not only geographically a long way away, but they also do not understand the foreign tax implications. Having a friendly capital gains structure in New Zealand helps with the tax issue (but still needs some explaining), and setting up your business in the United States and being there all the time provides assurance on the geographic issue.
Herald: What strategies have enabled you to be so successful in attracting capital from high-profile United States investors?
Paul Cameron: Being there, all the time. We only attracted investment from United States investors after spending a long time in the market building networks and understanding the local market. The Kiwi Expats Association (Kea) was a great resource to connect us with New Zealanders in the United States who had great networks. It is important that New Zealand entrepreneurs remember that our cultures are different even though we both speak English and watch the same TV shows. I once observed a New Zealand entrepreneur in the United States mistake a conversation on the Warriors to be about the New Zealand rugby league team and not the Golden State Warriors basketball team. New Zealand entrepreneurs need to think, act, and be local if they are going to attract US capital. That takes a lot of time and commitment.
We need to put more energy into making local investment dollars work for our tech sector versus cows, anti-personnel mines and property. We need to be able to tell dozens of high profile New Zealand success stories.
Vaughan Rowsell
Vaughan Rowsell: A few years ago we secured funding from Valar Ventures which is Peter Thiel’s vehicle to fund non-American businesses, and that immediately overcame the hurdles for us that you get with most other United States investors. They had the great idea that some of the world’s best companies will come from outside the States, and we are honoured to have been picked.
Herald: In your opinion, should more New Zealand companies be looking to the United States when embarking on seed and Series A capital raises?
Paul Cameron: The first question any New Zealand start-up trying to raise funds in the United States will be asked is “how much have you raised in New Zealand?” And then “why are you raising this round here and not in New Zealand?” New Zealand companies need really good answers to these questions if they have any chance of raising US capital. We New Zealanders sound and look funny to US investors, and while it might be cute, it is a super-competitive market for capital in the United States. New Zealand companies, especially at the seed stage, should always be raising in New Zealand unless they are already established in the United States, and have a good strategic reason to be seeking funds in the United States over New Zealand. Series A is a more likely stage to be approaching US investors for capital, but I would still try in New Zealand first as there are great funds like Sparkbox Ventures always on the look out for good deals.
Vaughan Rowsell: My advice to younger companies looking for capital is to look local, or at least over the Ditch. There is an emerging Australian Angel/VC base growing and a few New Zealand companies are finding success with them which is really exciting. Companies can also consider Singapore, but the further you need to fly the greater the pull will be to base yourself closer to the venture capitalist’s postcode. There are always exceptions to any rule, and for us that is Point Nine Capital, based out of Berlin, who again deviate from the usual profile of venture capital. They actively seek investment in world-class SaaS companies all over the globe, and have been very successful at that. It is my hope that more US investors start to follow Valar and Point Nine’s footsteps when they try and answer their own question, “Why are there so many damn world-beaters coming out of New Zealand?”
Herald: Is there more that our public and private financial sectors should be doing to ensure New Zealand companies can access US capital?
Paul Cameron: They already do a lot more than most people realise. Our Seed, Angel, Venture Capital and Private Equity funds and groups are well networked in the United States and leverage those networks for their investee companies. The Government, through NZTE, (NZ Trade and Enterprise), Mfat (Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade), Callaghan Innovation and Ateed (Auckland Tourist, Events and Economic Development) have vast investment networks that are working everyday to connect New Zealand companies with US capital.
Vaughan Rowsell: We attract attention by being awesome. It’s all a numbers game. If United States VCs feel like they are going to miss out on opportunities to invest in great companies that originate from New Zealand, then they will come here and invest.
In the meantime, we shouldn’t just wait and hope that happens. We should be doing all we can to help the current and future cohorts of amazing New Zealand businesses going global to make a dent and get noticed. The more successes we have as a nation in creating world-beating companies, the more attention we will get from the United States VCs and the rest of the world.
Herald: How do we do that?
Vaughan Rowsell: It’s a 15-year strategy. There is no silver bullet. Firstly, success in the industry begets success, so we need to do what we can locally to support the next Xero, Vend, Orion or Trade Me. We need to put more energy into making local investment dollars work for our tech sector versus cows, anti-personnel mines and property.
We need to be able to tell dozens of high profile New Zealand success stories. The importance of these stories are to inspire new people into starting businesses because they see how others have done it, and can literally sit down with the founders of companies making it and get advice. The stories also inspire future talent to go into technology careers and create the talent pool.
Herald: Are there any other important messages we should be sending regarding US capital investment in New Zealand?
Paul Cameron: There is plenty of capital in both New Zealand and United States for good Kiwi companies. For US investment, it really just comes down to the company strength, having great people involved, and a commitment to the United States market. Simple.
Vaughan Rowsell: Really simplistically, there are two choices: match the profile that United States investors look for in US companies, which often means becoming one and talking American; or decide you are a Kiwi-based enterprise and look to impress people who understand what awesome Kiwi-based businesses look like. In time, I hope FOMO [fear of missing out] brings more US capital to our shores, but in the meantime let’s create the FOMO.
Please follow and like us:

NZ tech sector attracts record offshore investment

New Zealand’s technology sector saw record growth in funding, driven by overseas investors in the year to March, according to the second annual Investors’ Guide to the New Zealand Technology Sector.
“The tech sector is New Zealand’s third largest exporting sector, contributing $16 billion to GDP (gross domestic product) and it is growing fast,” Economic Development Minister Simon Bridges said in a statement. “It presents multiple opportunities for New Zealand and international investors.”

Read more

Please follow and like us:

Investor Activity in NZ Tech Sector Continues to Intensify

Auckland, May 9, 2017 – Investment in New Zealand’s technology companies continues to rise, with record amounts of funding coming from offshore investors, according to the second annual Investor’s Guide to the New Zealand Technology Sector published jointly by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) and the Technology Investment Network (TIN).

Read more

Please follow and like us:

Kristen Lunman: Taking a chance on financial technology

In a little under three weeks, Kristen Lunman will know if her hard work supporting seven technology start-ups has paid off.
All seven are financial technology ventures – “fintechs” in the jargon – and the immediate challenge is to get them to the point where they are ready to seek investment.
As the programme director for New Zealand’s first fintech-focused business accelerator programme, the pressure is on in the countdown to demo day. That’s when the teams will pitch their business plans and – they hope – attract the crucial dollars that will enable them to forge ahead.
Lunman is no stranger to taking big chances.
The 39-year-old expat Canadian moved to Wellington six years ago with her husband and two pre-school children after falling in love with the country when the couple honeymooned here.
So when the kids were two and three we packed our suitcases up and moved,” she says.
They chose Wellington because it suited both her and her husband’s career ambitions.
“Ironically, my husband is in banking and I am in fintech.
“I have always been entrepreneurial-spirited and my husband is risk-averse.”
But together they make a good team, she says.
With a background in marketing, Lunman initially worked for property data company CoreLogic before shifting to online video review start-up Wipster.
Lunman says it was the time she spent there that enabled her to understand this country’s start-up sector.
“I got really got entrenched in the New Zealand start-up ecosystem,” she says.
Then the role with business incubator Creative HQ came up, to co-ordinate Kiwibank’s Fintech Accelerator programme ,and she jumped at the chance.
She says it’s about “being part of the movement … taking an entire sector looking at financial problems and looking at ways to solve it.
“It is not just about the three-month journey – the vision for the programme is actually as a catalyst to bring the financial ecosystem together.”
Lunman moved into the role in December, before the programme’s launch, and helped whittle down the more than 70 teams which auditioned for a place.
Nine teams made the final cut but already two have dropped out – one early on because of a family bereavement, and the other just last week after it became clear their idea was not going to be viable to take to market.
She says losing teams along the way is a normal part of the process, and “it’s better to do so before they get funding.”
Out of the seven teams, two are corporate – working on ideas put forward by Kiwibank and Xero – while the other five are what she calls organic.
The 12- to15-week programme is based on an American system which has been tailored to New Zealand and provides intensive mentoring.
The teams have to live in Wellington and commit fully to the experience during the three months.
I got really entrenched in the New Zealand start-up ecosystem.
Kristen Lunman, programme director for Kiwibank FinTech Accelerator
The ideas range from a team who want to make it easier and cheaper to transfer money to the Pacific Islands, to a wealth management team called Sharesies who want to make it simpler for anyone to invest with as little as $50.
Another team wants to work with property managers to improve their rental experience, while a fourth is proposing to offer businesses “robo-advice” on insurance.
Another hopes to take real accounting data from businesses and present it to students to help them get real-life experience of managing businesses, before they head out to get a job.
Lunman’s job is to focus on what the teams need in order to accelerate their good ideas into the market. That typically involves a pilot test which allows them to work on gaps and problems.
She says one of the unique challenges for fintechs is that the sector is highly regulated, so not only do their business concepts have to work, they also have to meet the regulations.
“We have been working very closely with the FMA (Financial Markets Authority) and MBIE (Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment).”
Lunman hopes that at the minimum, half of the teams will be at an investable stage by May 19, but ideally they would all be there.
Initial investments for start-ups are typically in the $500,000-$700,000 range and will come from a variety of sources including angel investors – individuals who are sufficiently well-off to take a punt on a start-up venture.
Lunman says the key ingredients for a promising start-up include having a passionate team that wants to solve a problem, and a market to take the solution to. But even then it can be hard to get a new venture over the line.
“It is not an easy road. Timing, ownership – all sorts of things have to come together.”
She doesn’t believe that having a financial background is necessary for start-up fintechs, and says some people have been successful without it.
“It’s just everyday Kiwis and businesses that have access to technology. I’m not convinced it has to come from the banking environment.”
She points to Apple Pay as an example, where technology has provided a money solution.
So far there hasn’t been a lot of disruption in New Zealand’s fintech sector.
Online crowd-funding platforms have opened up alternatives for both businesses and individuals to raise money, but they remain tiny in comparison with the major banks. And robo-advice – low-cost online financial advice based on algorithms – will be allowable here next year, after a law change that is now in the pipeline.
But Lunman says disruption is near-impossible in New Zealand.
“Banks have all the money and the customers,” she points out.
Instead, she believes there will be more of a move towards collaboration.
“Banks certainly recognise the need to innovate,” she says, but their silo approach and size make it hard for them to move quickly and introduce innovations.
“I think banks are looking to fintechs and recognising they do need to work with them.”
In Australia, Lunman says three major banks have already set up fintech hubs to work with and there are 15 fintech accelorator programmes.
Here, Kiwibank has been the first to back a fintech programme, but Lunman says others are talking about it.
This isn’t a 9 to 5 commitment. We live and breathe what we are doing.
Kristen Lunman
“I think we have got some work to do in terms of engaging some of the major players – other banks/insurance players.
“They are starting to discuss it but it will take some time.”
Despite the slow start, she believes collaboration will take off over the next five years. Regardless of the challenges, Lunman believes New Zealand has the opportunity to become a fintech hub.
New Zealanders are much more open than many people to using technology to help with their finances, she says, and points to our past as early adopters of eftpos technology.
“In North America they were still using cheques when I left.”
She says being in New Zealand presents no greater challenge for fintech start-ups than being in any other part of the world.
“I don’t think there is a greater challenge – it’s just different. A start-up is hard in any ecosystem.”
She points to Finland and Denmark – smaller countries which have thriving tech start-up sectors.
“They are small so they had to go global first.”
While those countries have Europe at their door, New Zealand has Asia, Australia and the US. “They are just different challenges really.”
As for what will happen to her after the programme, she doesn’t know yet but is confident she wants to keep working with start-ups.
“For myself personally that is to be determined. I know I want to stay in the start-up space. I would love it to be fintech.”
And while the programme is the first to focus on fintechs she doesn’t believe it will be the last.
“I don’t believe this is a one off.”
Kristen Lunman
• Job: Programme director for the Kiwibank Fintech Accelerator
• Age: 39
• Originally from: Canada
• Education: Bachelor of Commerce degree majoring in marketing and international business from the University of Northern British Columbia
• Family: Married to Kyle and has two children: Adelyn 10, Grayson 9
• Last movie watched: The Lego Batman Movie
• Last book read: Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and The Undoing Project by Michael Lewis
• Last overseas trip: To Vietnam in 2016 as part of a New Zealand tech delegation to explore the tech scene in South East Asia.
Please follow and like us:

NZ start-ups strong in foreign markets, survey shows

New Zealand start-ups have the highest percentage of overseas customers when measured against their counterparts from 50 other “ecosystems” including New York, Moscow, Beijing and London, according to the Compass Start-up Genome’s Ecosystem Ranking Survey.

The Compass Start-up Genome project team is based in San Francisco and benchmarks so-called start-up ecosystems from around the world. More than 100 Kiwi start-ups took part in the 2016 survey, according to the Angel Association of NZ. In New Zealand, the survey was led by the Angel Association with support from NZX, NZ Trade and Enterprise, the NZ Venture Investment Fund, Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment and Callaghan Innovation.

Read more

Please follow and like us:

Robotic apple packing developed by NZ company Robotics Plus ready to go offshore

A Tauranga company is ready to take its apple packing robotics offshore and help remove the headache of finding staff to do mundane work.

The automated apple packing machines place apples in trays “colour up” with the stems aligned, using sensors, software and electromechanical technology, and are expected to remove some of the monotonous work that apple packhouses find difficult to staff.

Read more

Please follow and like us:

Bay of Plenty investors take control of Rockit apple company

An argument over the ownership of the high-profile company responsible for producing the miniature Rockit apples has been resolved, with Bay of Plenty-based Oriens Capital and Auckland’s Pioneer Capital buying out company founder Phil Alison.
The Havelock North Fruit Company had been producing the apples, which are marketed in plastic tubes as a high quality snack food in New Zealand and internationally.
Mr Alison, who controlled a 49.5 per cent share of the company, originally wanted to buy out the remaining shareholders, which included a number of prominent Bay of Plenty investors. The disagreement went to the High Court last year after the parties failed to agree on price.
However, the company announced yesterday that an agreement had been reached by the shareholders under which the two experienced private equity companies would acquire all of Mr Alison’s shareholding. The transaction was also significant in being the first investment by Oriens Capital, the regions-focused Tauranga private equity firm launched last year.
Mr Alison has sold all his Rockit-related interests and would no longer be involved with the company, its subsidiaries, or related orchard suppliers of fruit.
Effective immediately, the company would begin trading as Rockit Global Ltd. Acting chief executive Austin Mortimer has been appointed chief executive of Rockit Global.
Chairman John Loughlin said the value of the transaction remained confidential.
Rockit snacks were now grown in seven countries and sold through partners in 22 countries, he said. In 2016, the company exported 77 containers of fruit and earned its maiden profit.
“With only 3 per cent of Rockit apple snacks sold in New Zealand, our sales and marketing focus is on key international markets,” Mr Loughlin said.
“We have strong growth plans for 2017 and the years ahead. The new shareholders have experience in growing New Zealand export businesses. They will contribute governance expertise and additional capital to help the company deliver on its ambitious growth plans.”
The Rockit Global board will include four members of the previous board – Mr Loughlin, plus well-known Tauranga investors Murray Denyer, Steve Saunders and Neil Craig. They would be joined by Oriens Capital chief executive James Beale and Pioneer Capital investment director Craig Styris.
Mr Loughlin said Mr Alison had made a huge contribution in recognising the potential of the fruit, then establishing and leading the business toward building the Rockit global brand.
“We will always be greatly appreciative of the work he put in to creating the international platform for the business,” he said.
Mr Denyer, a partner with Cooney Lees Morgan, Steve Saunders, founder of the Plus Group, and Neil Craig, founder of Craigs Investment Partners, are all Tauranga members of the Bay of Plenty’s Enterprise Angels start-up funding group.
“This is a major milestone for us,” said Mr Denyer.
“Bringing Pioneer and Oriens Capital into the business strengthens our share register enormously, and gives us access to their business expertise and experience,” he said.
“It’s also a success story for Enterprise Angels. Steve, Neil, John McDonald and myself all invested into this business back in 2011 when the founder first sought to raise capital. We’ve worked very hard to get the business to where it is today – to a point where it has gained the attention of and attracted investment from private equity players. It has graduated out of the angel investment space – something that few start-ups ever manage.”
Mr Mortimer described Rockit as significant New Zealand success story.
“It clearly demonstrates how high-quality fruit can be positioned as a premium, value-added product through a robust brand strategy. Rockit Global is now well-positioned to continue its rapid growth and capitalise on the substantial grab and go, healthy snack market.”
Rockit Global
– Rockit are miniature apples (1.5 x the size of a golf ball) with a sweet flavour, thin skin, and distinctive bright red blush.
– North Havelock Fruit Company worked with Plant & Food Research, together with Hawke’s Bay company Prevar, to develop the apple.
– Rockit Global now has the exclusive international licence to grow and market the PremA96 apple variety.
Please follow and like us:

Lead Partners

NZTE NZVIF

Expert Partner

NZX AVID AJ Park KPMG

AANZ Summit Sponsors

Calaghan Innovation Venture|360 Kiwinet Vodafone