Algae find sets firm on road to success

It makes salmon and cooked shellfish red. It’s in demand from marathon runners, performance athletes and the sports recovery market as a food supplement and its antioxidant qualities mean it may be beneficial in treating cardiovascular, immune and neurodegenerative diseases.

Auckland businessman and angel (or early stage company) investor Ray Thomson also stumbled across astaxanthin and Dowd’s fledgling astaxanthin company Supreme Biotech while at the Natural Products Conference in Nelson in 2010.

Traditionally New Zealand angel investors have been reticent about biotech but the sector’s image has been boosted recently by the outstanding performance of cancer diagnostics company Pacific Edge, says Thomson, who’s also chairman of the NZ Angel Association.

With revenue now at about $1 million a year, Thomson predicts Supreme Biotech is about six months away from breaking even and unlikely to need another angel funding round.

Angel investing is fundamental to New Zealand’s future wealth, says Thomson, and using the knowledge and experience of successful executives to mentor early-stage entrepreneurs as angels do is crucial in whether a new company succeeds or not. “[It] isn’t just about money. It’s about giving these entrepreneurs some real leadership and help along the way, that’s why it’s so exciting.”

Full story first published in the New Zealand Herald on Thursday February 13 2014

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