Dave Moskovitz named NZ Arch Angel 2018

One of New Zealand’s true champions of kiwi start-ups and angel investment, Dave Moskovitz, was awarded the Angel Association New Zealand’s (AANZ) Arch Angel Award at the 11th Anniversary NZ Angel Summit in Blenheim.

The Arch Angel Award is the highest honour in New Zealand’s angel investment community, and recognises individuals who reflect the qualities of the best angel investors and who are champions for the endeavour.

The award recognises the significant amount of time and money angels contribute to startups and early-stage companies – and specifically to their founders and teams – to help them reach their potential while also recognising angels who make a significant difference to New Zealand’s start-up ecosystem. The recipient is chosen by the previous years’ winners.

Dave has been investing in early-stage companies for a decade and been an investor director for a number of the ventures he has backed including ShowGizmo, The Appreciation Engine and Jaipuna. Most notably he was at the helm of peer-review publishing platform, Publons as Chair when that venture exited to UK-based Clarivate Analytics last year.

Dave has held governance roles with Wellington-based AngelHQ and was one of the founding fathers of New Zealand Start-up Weekends. He has mentored for 9 accelerator programmes helping dozens of ventures to secure funding and grow their businesses. Dave is an active member of InternetNZ, a member of the council of Open Polytech and was recently appointed to the Ministerial Advisory Group for Digital Economy and Digital Inclusion. He is also New Zealand’s representative to the Global Business Angel Network.

Former Arch Angel winner, Andy Hamilton, says one of the hallmarks of Dave’s work has been the importance he places on the role of empathy in business success.

“Dave takes a very genuine interest in supporting not just the success of the founders he backs, but also their wellbeing,” he said, noting that being a founder can be a very personally challenging role.

2012 winner, Movac’s Phil McCaw, who has worked with Dave over the years in the Wellington start-up and early stage investment scene, said Dave’s contribution to angel investment and start-ups in New Zealand is significant.

“Dave has freely given up countless weekends and evenings to work with people from all kinds of backgrounds who want to create new businesses. Making a difference and leaving the world better than he found it are integral components of Dave’s purpose. In investing in a number of these start-ups, he follows through very tangibly to deliver on that purpose.”

Speaking earlier in the year to Simon Morton on Radio New Zealand, Dave spoke with deep and personal insight about how successful angels and founders recycle skills and capital generating a virtuous cycle of further start-ups and cutting-edge roles in disruptive industries. He also spoke enthusiastically about the role start-up methodology could play improving the delivery of government services.

Dave received his award at the 11th Anniversary NZ Angel Summit, held at Marlborough Vintners in Blenheim and attended by 150 delegates. The annual event provides a hub for angels to learn and network, and is recognised as one of the world’s top angel events.

American born, Dave came to New Zealand over 25 years ago. He attended the University of California, Berkeley where he majored in computer science. He is one of three migrants to win the Arch Angel Award.

Former Arch Angel winners include The Warehouse founder and long-time angel investor Stephen Tindall; Andy Hamilton, chief executive of The Icehouse and member of IceAngels; US super angel Bill Payne; veteran angel investor Dr Ray Thomson; prolific AngelHQ member, Trevor Dickinson, former AANZ Chair, Marcel van den Assum and ardent angel investor, Debra Hall.

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On track for another record year

First half year results show angels are investing at rates on a par with previous years. The upward trajectory continues. It’s likely the formal part of the market will hit $100m into high growth start-ups this year.

Reporting on the activity of its members tracked by the NZ Venture Investment Fund, Angel Association Chair John O’Hara said $30.8m dollars was invested in 46 deals in the first six months of the year compared to $20.2m into 29 deals in the same period last year.

More detail and deeper insights can be found at www.pwc.co.nz/startupmagazine in the second edition of Startup Investment New Zealand; a collaboration between Angel Assn and PwC.

Mr O’Hara noted there is always a substantial uplift in activity in the second half of the year, in part inspired by two of the country’s larger angel networks, Ice Angels and AngelHQ, holding their annual venture showcases in September.

“This year Ice Angels’ showcase attracted 1000 guests and that level of enthusiasm has been reflected in capital commitments to the ventures presenting. AngelHQ’s showcase attendance numbers were also up,” said Mr O’Hara.

“We are seeing increasing valuations and amounts raised, and in many cases, start-ups are now appearing to be fully valued. While this is positive it comes with some challenges,” said Mr O’Hara.

“Start-ups that are too well funded can lose their edge and correspondingly high valuations put pressure on founders to deliver the requisite valuation uplift to ensure the next funding round is successful,” he noted.

These sorts of issues were discussed at the Angel Association’s first ever event for founders and investor-directors held the day before the industry’s annual summit in Blenheim on Wednesday 31 October 2018. Called “The Runway”, the day-long event brought together over 35 founders of high growth ventures and the angels who have backed them. As well as building a cohort of like-minded founders who support each other as their ventures scale, the initiative began to build tighter alignment and awareness of what it takes to scale an angel backed company.

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Key metrics for assessing an angel deal

This is a terrific article setting out key metrics to ask about when assessing an angel deal from David Jackson, a Committee Member of Sydney Angels Inc. Some great tips on how to be an effective angel investor are also embedded.

“Let’s say you have a brilliant idea for a startup.

You know your Hats-for-Cats app is going to take the world by storm. And while you may be half-starved, you have a whiteboard and a T-shirt with your logo on it, and the energy, guts, and grim determination to make it happen.

But the funds scraped together from friends, family, and savings for market research and a demo are now completely exhausted. The credit cards are completely maxed out. You’ve realised it may be time to find an angel investor who can lay enough runway for a developer and the go-live phase. The good news is: angels want to give you money. That’s our job.”

Read more

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International angel experts descend on Summit #AANZ18

The big event in the calendar for the Angel Association New Zealand is the annual Angel Summit.

This year our Summit focuses on the power of diversity and how it delivers better outcomes.

The world has changed significantly since we began over ten years ago. This year we acknowledge the changes and discuss how we can adapt, focusing on amping up the power of angel investment through diversity and inclusion to deliver higher value outcomes. We will be welcoming aligned VCs from NZ, Australia and Singapore to join the conversation and discuss questions like;

Why and how does a more feminine approach, both as founders and investors, add value?
What values do different ethnicities bring to angel backed ventures to increase the prospect of success?
Why is it important we include millennials in our ventures?

Joining our discussion will be;

Randy Komisar
Last year Randy Komisar, managing partner from Kleiner Perkins attended the summit with support from NZTE and Spark Ventures. Randy’s fireside chat at the end of the summit was one of the top rated presentations. As a direct result of his visit Randy was inspired to write “Straight Talk for Startups – 100 rules for beating the odds”. The book is currently ranked no.1 on Kindle’s Business Technology section. His return to NZ is intended to amplify the connections he made last year and he will play a lead role in The Runway event for founders and investor directors and spend a couple of days in Wellington.

Jeffrey Paine
Jeffrey Paine is a founding partner of Golden Gate Ventures based in Singapore. Since it’s inception in 2011 Golden Gate have invested in 30 companies across Asia. GoldenGate consider any ventures expanding into Asia and will invest between $US1-10m in early stage and series A rounds.

Wendee Wolfson
Wendee Wolfson co-founded one of the first angel networks in Washington DC, New Vantage Group with ACA Chair Emeritus, John May. She has chaired the US Angel Capital Association international exchange for the last seven years. Wendee is currently working with the Next Wave Impact Fund and has worked with the predecessor fund, Rising Tide, to educate and engage more women in early stage investment and will spend time in Auckland during her visit.

Marisa Warren
Marisa Warren is from Elevacao which has gained profile and traction in Australia, San Francisco and New York helping woman founders to scale and attract investment. Marisa has deep experience in corporate M&A and extensive networks.

Dr Sean Simpson
Dr Sean Simpson is one of the co-founders and current Chief Science Officer for Lanzatech which is ‘revolutionising the way the world thinks about carbon waste’. Sean has a tremendous depth of experience and belief in New Zealanders’ ability to change the world and will talk about lessons learned along the way as he led a team taking Lanzatech to the world. Dr. Simpson served as Leader of the Biofuels initiative at AgriGenesis BioSciences Ltd.

John Henderson
John is a Partner, Head of Venture and Business Development from Airtree Ventures based in Sydney. Airtree has made over 50 investments, including a number of NZ companies and had over a dozen exits.

We will also be privy to valuable input from a wealth of local early-stage investment experts including; the experience and insight of Marcel van den Assum, former Chair of the Angel Association and currently chairing a number of high growth ventures such as Wipster and Merlot Aero; the marketing chops of Vic Crone, CEO of Callaghan Innovation; the investment strategy of Richard Dellabarca, CEO of NZ Venture Investment Fund; and insights about fast track of growth from Janine Manning, Chair of Crimson Consulting, one of New Zealand’s most highly valued angel backed ventures.

This 11th annual Angel Summit will deliver a unique opportunity to learn how to invest to create a bright future for New Zealand, its talented entrepreneurs and drive returns so we can re-invest.

What will I come away from the summit with?
Friends and super relevant contacts, pithy, practical insights on how to be an angel with more impact, a great little goodie bag, and as is customary when you descend from a summit… arms full of inspiration!!

Check out the draft programme here.

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Angel investment rises 26% to reach record level

Startups in New Zealand received an unprecedented level of funding last year, with $86 million flowing into early-stage businesses across the country. That’s according to Startup Investment NZ, published by PwC New Zealand, the Angel Association of New Zealand (AANZ) and the New Zealand Venture Investment Fund (NZVIF).

“It’s exciting to see such a large number of deals coming through to support early-stage companies. We’re seeing investment levels that are almost three times what we saw just five years ago” said Anand Reddy, Partner at PwC New Zealand.

John O’Hara, AANZ Chair, endorsed this sentiment noting that membership of angel networks continues to grow with a new network established in Marlborough last year and a budding network getting started in the Hawkes Bay.

Established networks like Ice Angels in Auckland, AngelHQ in Wellington and Enterprise Angels in Tauranga are also experiencing growing memberships.

Driving the growth in investment dollars is an increasing number of larger deals in 2017, compared to the year before. The number of deals in 2017 held steady at 111 – one lower than the 12 months previous – the total amount invested has risen by $18 million, a 26% increase.

Offering some insight on the larger number of dollars being invested in a similar number of deals, John O’Hara suggested it reflected a maturing ecosystem.

“A number of the ventures angels have backed are now looking for larger capital injections to fuel their growth. With a thin VC industry, it’s not surprising we are seeing larger deal sizes.

John also offered a word of caution to investors and founders.

“The market’s a little frothy right now. We’re seeing some strong valuations. Entrepreneurs have to be sure they’re not setting the bar too high with their forecast results. If they fail to meet these, it’ll make it make it harder for them to get the next round of funding.

“And investors will be similarly impacted. Flat and down rounds do not impact well on portfolio return prospects.”

Click here to find out more about how the startup sector is evolving, and where it’s heading next.

Click here to dive into the data about this asset class.

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The network effect: NZ angel networks drive funding

Of the $86 million invested into young companies in 2017, over half ($49 million) came from angel investment networks, rather than individual funds or institutional investment.

“The strength of our angel investment networks in New Zealand is growing every day, which helps to explain why they’re responsible for a growing share of overall funding” says AANZ Chair John O’Hara.

“They’re responsible for over double the funding that’s coming through the next most-popular channel of angel funds.”

Raising funds from angel networks can take a little longer than other sources of early stage funding (such as mico-VCs and high networth individuals) given that sometimes over a dozen individual investors are collaborating to complete DD and gather the investment. Angel networks also tend to be run with a large component of voluntary input so founders and lead investors need to be committed project managers.

John notes that not only do networks tend to bring a larger pool of connections and expertise than single source funding options, they bring deeper reserves of connections for follow on funding.

“Angels are inveterate travellers and networkers and have connections in markets across the world which can be tapped for sales channels, in-market insights as well as follow on funding recommendations,” said John.

“Nothing beats getting on a plane with a line-up of carefully targeted meetings. New Zealand founders and investor directors need to spend more time in-market and be preparing for the founder to be based there,” John added.

He concluded by noting that lining up an in-market Board member was also an important component of scaling into offshore markets.

Click here to find out more about how the startup sector is evolving, and where it’s heading next.

Click here to dive into the data about this asset class.

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Software the top sector for NZ angel investors

More than half the investment made in early stage companies in New Zealand last year was in the software and services space (53.8%), followed by 17% in technology hardware and equipment.

“Technology is increasingly the engine of growth for all companies, regardless of size” explains PWC’s Anand Reddy.

“It’s no surprise that it’s these areas where the most activity is happening and where angel and early-stage investors are putting their energy. This reflects global trends too. Data generated by Crunchbase notes that the software and services remains the dominant sector for investment.”

Speaking personally, John O’Hara said that his own portfolio leant towards software generated ventures.

“I am particularly proud of Ask Nicely, which produces software for NPS (net promoter score) collection and analysis. This company has already generated tangible returns for a number of the early angel investors. The company is now scaling into the US, with the founder moving to Portland, Oregon in the last couple of months.

“New Zealanders have a knack for practical problem solution and we are increasingly seeing them turn this knack into compelling business opportunities,” said O’Hara.

Click here to find out more about how the startup sector is evolving, and where it’s heading next.

Click here to dive into the data about this asset class.

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Waiheke Angel Summit Reflections

The best things about this year’s angel summit…

The annual summit always reinforces why angel investment is my thing.

Angel investors are unapologetically optimistic, creative, generous and ambitious. And our community cares… to their bone marrow, those involved in early stage investment care! These people are ambitious for the success of the founders and ventures they are working with and they are genuinely ambitious for New Zealand.

Kiwi early stage investors want to see the incredibly cool stuff we do in New Zealand get out to the world, they want to help create fabulous jobs in New Zealand, they want to contribute to raising our living standards and to the creation of role models for our budding entrepreneurs.

I came away super-chuffed about the real pride in our New Zealand-ness which imbued this year’s event. It really feels like we are at the tipping point of cracking serious success. New Zealand innovators and founders are absolutely worth backing.

And guess what? At the same time as we begin to acknowledge the real value of being kiwi, we get a bunch of proof points that kiwi founders and innovation really does deliver. The ventures angel investors have been helping to scale are becoming more and more appealing to others. This year Apple bought PowerbyProxi, US-based Clarivate bought Publons and UK-based Oxford Metrics bought IMeasureU.

Key themes at the summit which will help us continue to amp up the appeal and success of angel backed companies include:
• genuinely put the founder first – be empathetic, be accessible and be truly aligned;
• start with the end in mind and work unrelentingly towards it – together;
• know what it’s going to take to achieve liquidity – deeply understand your capital strategy and potential acquirers;
• actively manage your portfolio; and
• at all times focus on adding value.

In a future post I want to dig deeper into how angels best support founders to deliver the dreams they have to change the world. But to augment the take-outs from this year’s event I’ve extracted couple of quotes and insights from some of our keynote speakers.

Ian Taylor – Animation Research Limited
• Bugger the boxing, pour the concrete anyway
• Well it wasn’t a failure… it just didn’t work

Deb Hall – New Zealand ‘angeling’
• By the end of 2006, NZVIF recorded 55 deals and $30m of investment. By the end of 2016 nearly 1000 deals have been done, with $484m invested in nearly 200 companies.
• Over half the angel community spend more than a day week mentoring and supporting founders.

Phil McCaw and Andy Hamilton – what’s next
• Phil – “I see a bright future. As a country and a world we are going through a process of massive social change. The capitalist model is going to reshape and be reborn”
• Andy – “New Zealand will be way better off, the more angels we have.”

Bruno Bordignon – term sheets
• Context is everything. Always ask ‘how does this term or will this term apply to me/the stage of my venture/the sector it’s in/the growth plan I have/the liquidity plan I have.

Justin Milano – exponential mindsets and the triangle of founder expansion
• Shift anxiety and the need to control uncontrollable outcomes to selfless service and generosity. How am I being asked to serve today? There is always something you can do to add value.
• Shift from beating yourself up to a growth mind-set. Be kind to yourself. It’s all about learning, growing and embracing challenges.
• Shift from a head space of “I am my company” [or investment] and free yourself from self- importance. Acknowledge you are not your company [or investment] and instead accept that “this mission is bigger than me” and adopt a sense of humility.

Ron Weissman – the importance of capital strategy
• Don’t ignore the boring stuff like capital models and capital risks. These are the key to success.
• Key capital risks include: capital inefficiency, no follow-on investors, misaligned investors, larger liquidation preference shares, management carve outs.
• Only 15% of angel backed companies achieve an exit of greater than $US50m.

Dan Bernstein – building exit value
• Mistakes made when ventures are being bought: having only one buyer, there is internal company conflict, poor due diligence preparation, poor qualification and management of buyers, ego, greed and arrogance, maximising profit and minimising growth.

Richard Dellabarca – managing your portfolio for returns
• A lack of exits is unsustainable for the ecosystem. Capital needs to be recycled.
• SCIF2.0 will focus on returns, opportunities with a global thesis, reserving capital for those getting traction, up to $1.5m for top performers (vs $500k under SCIF1.0).
• Since 1 July 2017, SCIF2.0 has approved 59% of deals presented, with a higher approval rate for follow on deals and declines being notified within 2 weeks.

Sam Stubbs – more capital is coming
• Kiwisaver is a $42bn saving pool which will grow to $200bn by 2030.
• Kiwisaver providers want to invest in early stage but are not currently being provided with the right products and mechanisms to be able to do so.
• Bigger follow-on cheques are coming.

Arama Kukutai – corporate venture capital
• Agtech activity has more than doubled by value and volume since 2014.
• US venture capital accounts for 47% of world-wide capital invested in agtech startups.
• In the agtech sector, corporate venturing and collaboration with VCs is becoming increasingly common and more sophisticated to generate win/win outcomes.

Randy Komisar – why do this? investment motivations and M.O
• Is this the deal, are these founders and is this cause… worth failing for?
• Investing in startups is about people and value creation, not about buying low and selling high.
• Don’t emulate any other place on the planet, do your thing. Protect and promote what you have as New Zealanders.
• If you can plot success for a company, it’s probably wrong or not worth doing.
• Fighting for crumbs on the table is no way to get cake – a reference to niggling over terms.

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Treatment of women & diversity in angel investment

Shabby, unkind and unprofessional treatment of women by men (and sometimes by other women) whether in venture capital or more broadly is unacceptable. While women have had the rough end of the stick for hundreds of years, being treated fairly and kindly should not be gender specific.

It is not about being a woman or a man or even religion or ethnicity. It’s about the values we choose to live by and which values give us a greater crack at success – however we define success!

How we treat each other and the importance of diversity is about a set of values and two values in particular – kindness and respect.

Supporting and scaling start-ups is no walk in the park. It’s often challenging and down right terrifying – for founders and investors. The fear of failure and rejection is always skulking in the shadows of fund raising, closing a sales deal and hiring senior employees. It’s anxiety inducing.

More kindness and respect would not go amiss. The AANZ believes both are key components of success, particularly when it comes to successfully scaling high growth startups.

We need to acknowledge that tough conversations are often necessary in our world. These may feel unkind but the pain can be minimised if respect and empathy – without bias – are at the heart of these conversations too.

Values complimenting kindness also support the importance of diversity. Kindness requires open-mindedness, curiosity and exploring different points of view. Successful founders live these values and these values are at the heart of the informed pivot and the ability to create and build value.

Kindness must underpin ensuring there is diversity in our deal flow, at our events and in our governance. Diversity mustn’t be about tokenism or ticking a box. Delivering diversity is about trying and looking harder to ensure it exists. It’s about valuing people to create value. We should select women (or Maori or Chinese or Buddhist) founders, speakers and board members based on their ability to shine and help others to shine. To do anything other than this is unkind – to everyone, and especially to the ‘box tickee’.

The AANZ Code of Conduct can be found here. We have added two clauses to the behaviours we expect. They are to be:
– Kind and respectful, and
– Supportive of diversity

As an industry we take responsibility, individually and collectively, for reflecting the behaviours set out in the Code of Conduct. We will talk quietly to those we are worried might not be reflecting these. We are not advocates of naming and shaming. That’s not kind or respectful.

The AANZ Constitution, however, makes it clear that our members must be “of good standing in the angel investment community” and there is provision for members to be expelled when this is no longer the case. The profound potential for common good inherent in angel investment is squandered when the self-interest reflected in unkindness is prioritised.

We all have circles of inspiration and impact – we must be the change we want to see – it’s powerful stuff.

Onwards…

Suse Reynolds
Executive Director

“Constant kindness can accomplish much. As the sun makes ice melt, kindness causes misunderstanding, mistrust, and hostility to evaporate.” – Albert Schweitzer

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Dave Moskovitz – Publons angel exit

Like so many in the startup and early stage investment community, the AANZ is delighted to congratulate the Publons founders and investors on the company’s recent acquisition by Clarivate. This outcome is an inspirational proof point that those sometimes elusive returns are actually achievable. Publons Chair and AngelHQ member, Dave Moskovitz writes about building strategic value and all those who were part of supporting the Publons team here.

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Lead Partners

NZTE NZVIF PWC

Expert Partner

AVID “FNZC.jpg”

AANZ Summit Sponsors

Callaghan Innovation “UniServices” Kiwinet “Spark”