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Diversity … making a difference and delivering outcomes

Last year we celebrated a decade of angel investing in New Zealand. And it was terrific to have that line up with some impressive success for angel backed companies with PowerbyProxi selling to Apple, Publons selling to Clarivate and ImeasureU selling to Oxford Metrics. Last year was also record year for ‘dollars into deals’ with a 26% increase on the previous year’s investment at $86m.

We are genuinely creating value for New Zealand and New Zealanders. At this year’s summit we will focus on amping up that value through the power of diversity. Why and how does a more feminine approach, both as founders and investors, add value? What values do different ethnicities bring to angel backed ventures to increase the prospect of success? Why is it important we include millennials in our ventures?

It’s all about making a difference… diversity and inclusion delivers higher value outcomes.

The 11th Annual NZ Angel Summit, 1/2 November, is being held at Marlborough Vintners, 10 minutes drive from Blenheim and in amongst the vineyards. We deliberately choose smaller intimate venues to ensure we create the right atmosphere for relaxed and rewarding conversations. Our last three summits have sold out as we prioritise places for those ‘doing deals’.

On the first morning we set the context for the two days by reviewing the year and have a session on the values that drive angel investors and how these impact on success. In the afternoon we apply these insights to the more practical aspects of angel investment with sessions on the new industry standard term sheet, how to ensure alignment with follow-on funding sources and dig into the government’s plans to support our endeavours, particularly with respect to tax reform. On Friday morning we focus on our own heroes and hear first-hand from some of our founders and investors who getting real traction offshore. All of this will be shot through with input from successful women and millennials in our community and deep engagement with Maori and our Asian investor migrant community.

Click here to register

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Angel investment rises 26% to reach record level

Startups in New Zealand received an unprecedented level of funding last year, with $86 million flowing into early-stage businesses across the country. That’s according to Startup Investment NZ, published by PwC New Zealand, the Angel Association of New Zealand (AANZ) and the New Zealand Venture Investment Fund (NZVIF).

“It’s exciting to see such a large number of deals coming through to support early-stage companies. We’re seeing investment levels that are almost three times what we saw just five years ago” said Anand Reddy, Partner at PwC New Zealand.

John O’Hara, AANZ Chair, endorsed this sentiment noting that membership of angel networks continues to grow with a new network established in Marlborough last year and a budding network getting started in the Hawkes Bay.

Established networks like Ice Angels in Auckland, AngelHQ in Wellington and Enterprise Angels in Tauranga are also experiencing growing memberships.

Driving the growth in investment dollars is an increasing number of larger deals in 2017, compared to the year before. The number of deals in 2017 held steady at 111 – one lower than the 12 months previous – the total amount invested has risen by $18 million, a 26% increase.

Offering some insight on the larger number of dollars being invested in a similar number of deals, John O’Hara suggested it reflected a maturing ecosystem.

“A number of the ventures angels have backed are now looking for larger capital injections to fuel their growth. With a thin VC industry, it’s not surprising we are seeing larger deal sizes.

John also offered a word of caution to investors and founders.

“The market’s a little frothy right now. We’re seeing some strong valuations. Entrepreneurs have to be sure they’re not setting the bar too high with their forecast results. If they fail to meet these, it’ll make it make it harder for them to get the next round of funding.

“And investors will be similarly impacted. Flat and down rounds do not impact well on portfolio return prospects.”

Click here to find out more about how the startup sector is evolving, and where it’s heading next.

Click here to dive into the data about this asset class.

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The network effect: NZ angel networks drive funding

Of the $86 million invested into young companies in 2017, over half ($49 million) came from angel investment networks, rather than individual funds or institutional investment.

“The strength of our angel investment networks in New Zealand is growing every day, which helps to explain why they’re responsible for a growing share of overall funding” says AANZ Chair John O’Hara.

“They’re responsible for over double the funding that’s coming through the next most-popular channel of angel funds.”

Raising funds from angel networks can take a little longer than other sources of early stage funding (such as mico-VCs and high networth individuals) given that sometimes over a dozen individual investors are collaborating to complete DD and gather the investment. Angel networks also tend to be run with a large component of voluntary input so founders and lead investors need to be committed project managers.

John notes that not only do networks tend to bring a larger pool of connections and expertise than single source funding options, they bring deeper reserves of connections for follow on funding.

“Angels are inveterate travellers and networkers and have connections in markets across the world which can be tapped for sales channels, in-market insights as well as follow on funding recommendations,” said John.

“Nothing beats getting on a plane with a line-up of carefully targeted meetings. New Zealand founders and investor directors need to spend more time in-market and be preparing for the founder to be based there,” John added.

He concluded by noting that lining up an in-market Board member was also an important component of scaling into offshore markets.

Click here to find out more about how the startup sector is evolving, and where it’s heading next.

Click here to dive into the data about this asset class.

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Software the top sector for NZ angel investors

More than half the investment made in early stage companies in New Zealand last year was in the software and services space (53.8%), followed by 17% in technology hardware and equipment.

“Technology is increasingly the engine of growth for all companies, regardless of size” explains PWC’s Anand Reddy.

“It’s no surprise that it’s these areas where the most activity is happening and where angel and early-stage investors are putting their energy. This reflects global trends too. Data generated by Crunchbase notes that the software and services remains the dominant sector for investment.”

Speaking personally, John O’Hara said that his own portfolio leant towards software generated ventures.

“I am particularly proud of Ask Nicely, which produces software for NPS (net promoter score) collection and analysis. This company has already generated tangible returns for a number of the early angel investors. The company is now scaling into the US, with the founder moving to Portland, Oregon in the last couple of months.

“New Zealanders have a knack for practical problem solution and we are increasingly seeing them turn this knack into compelling business opportunities,” said O’Hara.

Click here to find out more about how the startup sector is evolving, and where it’s heading next.

Click here to dive into the data about this asset class.

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Waiheke Angel Summit Reflections

The best things about this year’s angel summit…

The annual summit always reinforces why angel investment is my thing.

Angel investors are unapologetically optimistic, creative, generous and ambitious. And our community cares… to their bone marrow, those involved in early stage investment care! These people are ambitious for the success of the founders and ventures they are working with and they are genuinely ambitious for New Zealand.

Kiwi early stage investors want to see the incredibly cool stuff we do in New Zealand get out to the world, they want to help create fabulous jobs in New Zealand, they want to contribute to raising our living standards and to the creation of role models for our budding entrepreneurs.

I came away super-chuffed about the real pride in our New Zealand-ness which imbued this year’s event. It really feels like we are at the tipping point of cracking serious success. New Zealand innovators and founders are absolutely worth backing.

And guess what? At the same time as we begin to acknowledge the real value of being kiwi, we get a bunch of proof points that kiwi founders and innovation really does deliver. The ventures angel investors have been helping to scale are becoming more and more appealing to others. This year Apple bought PowerbyProxi, US-based Clarivate bought Publons and UK-based Oxford Metrics bought IMeasureU.

Key themes at the summit which will help us continue to amp up the appeal and success of angel backed companies include:
• genuinely put the founder first – be empathetic, be accessible and be truly aligned;
• start with the end in mind and work unrelentingly towards it – together;
• know what it’s going to take to achieve liquidity – deeply understand your capital strategy and potential acquirers;
• actively manage your portfolio; and
• at all times focus on adding value.

In a future post I want to dig deeper into how angels best support founders to deliver the dreams they have to change the world. But to augment the take-outs from this year’s event I’ve extracted couple of quotes and insights from some of our keynote speakers.

Ian Taylor – Animation Research Limited
• Bugger the boxing, pour the concrete anyway
• Well it wasn’t a failure… it just didn’t work

Deb Hall – New Zealand ‘angeling’
• By the end of 2006, NZVIF recorded 55 deals and $30m of investment. By the end of 2016 nearly 1000 deals have been done, with $484m invested in nearly 200 companies.
• Over half the angel community spend more than a day week mentoring and supporting founders.

Phil McCaw and Andy Hamilton – what’s next
• Phil – “I see a bright future. As a country and a world we are going through a process of massive social change. The capitalist model is going to reshape and be reborn”
• Andy – “New Zealand will be way better off, the more angels we have.”

Bruno Bordignon – term sheets
• Context is everything. Always ask ‘how does this term or will this term apply to me/the stage of my venture/the sector it’s in/the growth plan I have/the liquidity plan I have.

Justin Milano – exponential mindsets and the triangle of founder expansion
• Shift anxiety and the need to control uncontrollable outcomes to selfless service and generosity. How am I being asked to serve today? There is always something you can do to add value.
• Shift from beating yourself up to a growth mind-set. Be kind to yourself. It’s all about learning, growing and embracing challenges.
• Shift from a head space of “I am my company” [or investment] and free yourself from self- importance. Acknowledge you are not your company [or investment] and instead accept that “this mission is bigger than me” and adopt a sense of humility.

Ron Weissman – the importance of capital strategy
• Don’t ignore the boring stuff like capital models and capital risks. These are the key to success.
• Key capital risks include: capital inefficiency, no follow-on investors, misaligned investors, larger liquidation preference shares, management carve outs.
• Only 15% of angel backed companies achieve an exit of greater than $US50m.

Dan Bernstein – building exit value
• Mistakes made when ventures are being bought: having only one buyer, there is internal company conflict, poor due diligence preparation, poor qualification and management of buyers, ego, greed and arrogance, maximising profit and minimising growth.

Richard Dellabarca – managing your portfolio for returns
• A lack of exits is unsustainable for the ecosystem. Capital needs to be recycled.
• SCIF2.0 will focus on returns, opportunities with a global thesis, reserving capital for those getting traction, up to $1.5m for top performers (vs $500k under SCIF1.0).
• Since 1 July 2017, SCIF2.0 has approved 59% of deals presented, with a higher approval rate for follow on deals and declines being notified within 2 weeks.

Sam Stubbs – more capital is coming
• Kiwisaver is a $42bn saving pool which will grow to $200bn by 2030.
• Kiwisaver providers want to invest in early stage but are not currently being provided with the right products and mechanisms to be able to do so.
• Bigger follow-on cheques are coming.

Arama Kukutai – corporate venture capital
• Agtech activity has more than doubled by value and volume since 2014.
• US venture capital accounts for 47% of world-wide capital invested in agtech startups.
• In the agtech sector, corporate venturing and collaboration with VCs is becoming increasingly common and more sophisticated to generate win/win outcomes.

Randy Komisar – why do this? investment motivations and M.O
• Is this the deal, are these founders and is this cause… worth failing for?
• Investing in startups is about people and value creation, not about buying low and selling high.
• Don’t emulate any other place on the planet, do your thing. Protect and promote what you have as New Zealanders.
• If you can plot success for a company, it’s probably wrong or not worth doing.
• Fighting for crumbs on the table is no way to get cake – a reference to niggling over terms.

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Treatment of women & diversity in angel investment

Shabby, unkind and unprofessional treatment of women by men (and sometimes by other women) whether in venture capital or more broadly is unacceptable. While women have had the rough end of the stick for hundreds of years, being treated fairly and kindly should not be gender specific.

It is not about being a woman or a man or even religion or ethnicity. It’s about the values we choose to live by and which values give us a greater crack at success – however we define success!

How we treat each other and the importance of diversity is about a set of values and two values in particular – kindness and respect.

Supporting and scaling start-ups is no walk in the park. It’s often challenging and down right terrifying – for founders and investors. The fear of failure and rejection is always skulking in the shadows of fund raising, closing a sales deal and hiring senior employees. It’s anxiety inducing.

More kindness and respect would not go amiss. The AANZ believes both are key components of success, particularly when it comes to successfully scaling high growth startups.

We need to acknowledge that tough conversations are often necessary in our world. These may feel unkind but the pain can be minimised if respect and empathy – without bias – are at the heart of these conversations too.

Values complimenting kindness also support the importance of diversity. Kindness requires open-mindedness, curiosity and exploring different points of view. Successful founders live these values and these values are at the heart of the informed pivot and the ability to create and build value.

Kindness must underpin ensuring there is diversity in our deal flow, at our events and in our governance. Diversity mustn’t be about tokenism or ticking a box. Delivering diversity is about trying and looking harder to ensure it exists. It’s about valuing people to create value. We should select women (or Maori or Chinese or Buddhist) founders, speakers and board members based on their ability to shine and help others to shine. To do anything other than this is unkind – to everyone, and especially to the ‘box tickee’.

The AANZ Code of Conduct can be found here. We have added two clauses to the behaviours we expect. They are to be:
– Kind and respectful, and
– Supportive of diversity

As an industry we take responsibility, individually and collectively, for reflecting the behaviours set out in the Code of Conduct. We will talk quietly to those we are worried might not be reflecting these. We are not advocates of naming and shaming. That’s not kind or respectful.

The AANZ Constitution, however, makes it clear that our members must be “of good standing in the angel investment community” and there is provision for members to be expelled when this is no longer the case. The profound potential for common good inherent in angel investment is squandered when the self-interest reflected in unkindness is prioritised.

We all have circles of inspiration and impact – we must be the change we want to see – it’s powerful stuff.

Onwards…

Suse Reynolds
Executive Director

“Constant kindness can accomplish much. As the sun makes ice melt, kindness causes misunderstanding, mistrust, and hostility to evaporate.” – Albert Schweitzer

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Dave Moskovitz – Publons angel exit

Like so many in the startup and early stage investment community, the AANZ is delighted to congratulate the Publons founders and investors on the company’s recent acquisition by Clarivate. This outcome is an inspirational proof point that those sometimes elusive returns are actually achievable. Publons Chair and AngelHQ member, Dave Moskovitz writes about building strategic value and all those who were part of supporting the Publons team here.

Read more

 

 

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NZ Angel Values and Expectations

People do business with people. This is a universal truth, but in angel and early stage investment, the people side is writ large.

Angels and founders share a hunger for success and making a difference. It is this trait that aligns us so tightly.

There are a number of other values that underpin an angel investor’s effectiveness. A year or two back it seemed a good idea to explicitly set out these values and how we expect each other to behave, so the Angel Association agreed a Code of Conduct.

It sets out the following values as being important to us:

  • To be passionately ambitious for our ventures,
  • To be collaborative and collegial, and
  • To act with integrity and honesty.

Growing a successful business is hard work. Without passion and ambition, the knock-backs and grind of growing a business would quickly overwhelm most us. Angels share other traits with founders that are critical to success; unremitting optimism and creativity. The ability to positively and constructively address problems is powerful stuff.

Growing a successful business is never done alone. Generosity of spirit is one of the most inspirational aspects of working in angel investment. Angels bring value which goes way beyond their ability to write a cheque. Our experience, networks and expertise are the real rocket fuel. And what’s more, when a founder receives money from an investor in the formal NZ angel community, that investor is bringing over 600 people who share a generosity of spirit and values of collaboration and collegiality.

Another key component of success in the angel world is honesty and integrity. We have made it clear that communicating quickly and clearly is vital. We put great store on ‘doing what you say you are going to do’. When we commit to invest or offer to make an introduction, you should expect we will do it. If we are required to sign a document, you should expect it to be done quickly. Of course this isn’t always possible. We all know “life” happens, but you should expect that if something does get in the way of our doing what we said we would, we will communicate.

We also expect professionalism. Dealing professionally with each other sets the standard we expect of ourselves and our ventures as they grow into world-beating enterprises. Time and energy can be scarce resources in this setting. Sometimes this makes it challenging to operate at the levels of professionalism we are used to in other parts of our lives, but we strive for it nevertheless. Angel investors are also by definition actively involved in the business and with the founder. This level of familiarity also requires us to be sensitive to the need for professionalism.

These principles serve as the foundation for our dealings with each other and are the standards others working with us, such as founders and professional service providers, should expect.

What does this look like in practice?

If you are seeking angel investment should know that our members are looking for a credible entrepreneur with aspirations to grow an internationally competitive business with a well-defined product, customer and market. You should expect professional, prompt, objective and constructive guidance from our members, whether or not you ultimately secure capital.

Ends

Suze Reynolds

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Mahuki – bringing innovation to the global GLAM sector

Te Papa launched its first acceleration programme, Mahuki, in August. The programme is now nearing the half way mark.

There are ten start-up teams focused on innovating the GLAM sector (Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums). It is an in-residence programme and the Mahuki hub is located within Te Papa. The teams are working closely with museum experts, museum visitors and other cultural institutions to validate their ideas and build sustainable global businesses.

Given the size of the New Zealand market and our distance from bigger economies, Mahuki aims to take a ‘global from day one’ approach. To explore market opportunities, Mahuki will take these teams on a two week trip to the US towards the end of the programme.

The GLAM sector represents prestigious customers and large markets (it represents 4.3% of GDP in the US – larger than the construction industry). There are more museums in the world than MacDonald’s and Starbucks combined. There are in fact an estimated 75,000 of them, with 35,000 located in the US.  And while numbers of museums are still modest in China, that market has developed rapidly with a new museum opening every day.

The cultural sector is ripe for transformation – but entrepreneurs don’t necessarily know how to access the sector, how to best meet its needs or even recognise it’s potential.  At the same time, the experience economy is booming. However, no matter how large or attractive a market is – this means nothing if you don’t know how to access it.

The Mahuki programme has been designed to build the capability of businesses to deliver effectively to this valuable sector. Some of the key innovation trends and opportunities being seen in the sector include things such as augmented and virtual reality, gamification, location based services, mobile and BYOD, natural user interfaces, personalised goods and services, and wearable technology.

Mahuki can be translated as “perceptive” and it relates to the “wellspring of inspiration”. The Mahuki.org website provides more details about the programme, and you can get a small taste of the ten teams here –  http://www.mahuki.org/about/participants

Te Papa will host a Mahuki showcase event on Monday 5 December and an invitation will circulate Angel groups soon.”

 

 

 

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Amplifying NZ’s kotahitanga – working together for our people

One of THE best days I’ve had at work this year was the one I spent with fellow judges, Robin Hapi and Ian Taylor, talking to the finalists in the inaugural Maori Economy category of the HiTech Awards.

Without exception these finalists were not only great businesses – spanning startups to mature enterprises – they were also being run by talented, wonderful people.

What excited me though was how vividly clear it was that the values under pinning these businesses were shared by New Zealand’s angel investors.

As I said in my last post, we know angel investors join our networks for the following reasons:

  • To lift New Zealand higher – economically and socially;
  • To be actually involved in doing this – by contributing money, expertise and connections;
  • For the cool company – to be involved with like-minded, positive people; and
  • For the rich rewards – of course they hope for a financial return but the “psychic return” of doing good and contributing to lifting NZ higher is also a key reason why people become angels.

These values align with key values in Maori business such as:

  • Puawaitanga – the best possible return is sought on integrated goals, including but not just financial outcomes;
  • Kotahitanga – unity and a shared sense of belonging to work together for the benefit of your people;
  • Whanaungatanga – acknowledges the importance of networks and relationships, of developing, managing and sustaining relationships; and
  • Kaitiakitanga – which is about guardianship of natural resources but also extends to sustainable enterprise and taking care of assets as kaitiaki or guardians, the owners and trustees of an enterprise are responsible for protecting (and/or growing) resources for future generations.

The call for more Maori engagement in our rock star, high growth businesses and business people is getting louder. The New Zealand economy generally and the Maori economy specifically need more successful entrepreneurs. Did you know that all the net new job growth in an economy comes from new businesses?

Ian Taylor made the point during the day we spent with the finalists that our young people need more successful business role models. So true!!

Many of these budding role models and businesses would benefit from angel support. Providing capital is only a part of what angels provide. The money is just the fuel in the tank. Fuel in the tank means very little without skill behind the wheel and an experienced support crew. Experienced people who’ve been there before, who know who to talk to and where to source the best resources. And like driving a Formula One car, angel investment is not for the faint hearted. It’s a portfolio game with 90% of your returns coming from just 10% of your portfolio ventures.

More Maori engagement in early stage investment, will find the right time and place to come alive and gain momentum but the word is out now … New Zealand’s angel investment community is keen to do as much as it can possibly can to help.

Ends

 

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Lead Partners

NZTE NZVIF PWC

Expert Partner

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AANZ Summit Sponsors

Callaghan Innovation “UniServices” Kiwinet “Spark”