International angel experts descend on Summit #AANZ18

The big event in the calendar for the Angel Association New Zealand is the annual Angel Summit.

This year our Summit focuses on the power of diversity and how it delivers better outcomes.

The world has changed significantly since we began over ten years ago. This year we acknowledge the changes and discuss how we can adapt, focusing on amping up the power of angel investment through diversity and inclusion to deliver higher value outcomes. We will be welcoming aligned VCs from NZ, Australia and Singapore to join the conversation and discuss questions like;

Why and how does a more feminine approach, both as founders and investors, add value?
What values do different ethnicities bring to angel backed ventures to increase the prospect of success?
Why is it important we include millennials in our ventures?

Joining our discussion will be;

Randy Komisar
Last year Randy Komisar, managing partner from Kleiner Perkins attended the summit with support from NZTE and Spark Ventures. Randy’s fireside chat at the end of the summit was one of the top rated presentations. As a direct result of his visit Randy was inspired to write “Straight Talk for Startups – 100 rules for beating the odds”. The book is currently ranked no.1 on Kindle’s Business Technology section. His return to NZ is intended to amplify the connections he made last year and he will play a lead role in The Runway event for founders and investor directors and spend a couple of days in Wellington.

Jeffrey Paine
Jeffrey Paine is a founding partner of Golden Gate Ventures based in Singapore. Since it’s inception in 2011 Golden Gate have invested in 30 companies across Asia. GoldenGate consider any ventures expanding into Asia and will invest between $US1-10m in early stage and series A rounds.

Wendee Wolfson
Wendee Wolfson co-founded one of the first angel networks in Washington DC, New Vantage Group with ACA Chair Emeritus, John May. She has chaired the US Angel Capital Association international exchange for the last seven years. Wendee is currently working with the Next Wave Impact Fund and has worked with the predecessor fund, Rising Tide, to educate and engage more women in early stage investment and will spend time in Auckland during her visit.

Marisa Warren
Marisa Warren is from Elevacao which has gained profile and traction in Australia, San Francisco and New York helping woman founders to scale and attract investment. Marisa has deep experience in corporate M&A and extensive networks.

Dr Sean Simpson
Dr Sean Simpson is one of the co-founders and current Chief Science Officer for Lanzatech which is ‘revolutionising the way the world thinks about carbon waste’. Sean has a tremendous depth of experience and belief in New Zealanders’ ability to change the world and will talk about lessons learned along the way as he led a team taking Lanzatech to the world. Dr. Simpson served as Leader of the Biofuels initiative at AgriGenesis BioSciences Ltd.

John Henderson
John is a Partner, Head of Venture and Business Development from Airtree Ventures based in Sydney. Airtree has made over 50 investments, including a number of NZ companies and had over a dozen exits.

We will also be privy to valuable input from a wealth of local early-stage investment experts including; the experience and insight of Marcel van den Assum, former Chair of the Angel Association and currently chairing a number of high growth ventures such as Wipster and Merlot Aero; the marketing chops of Vic Crone, CEO of Callaghan Innovation; the investment strategy of Richard Dellabarca, CEO of NZ Venture Investment Fund; and insights about fast track of growth from Janine Manning, Chair of Crimson Consulting, one of New Zealand’s most highly valued angel backed ventures.

This 11th annual Angel Summit will deliver a unique opportunity to learn how to invest to create a bright future for New Zealand, its talented entrepreneurs and drive returns so we can re-invest.

What will I come away from the summit with?
Friends and super relevant contacts, pithy, practical insights on how to be an angel with more impact, a great little goodie bag, and as is customary when you descend from a summit… arms full of inspiration!!

Check out the draft programme here.

Please follow and like us:

USA ACA trip reports

In May, a “Kiwi Contingent” of about a dozen angels attended the US Angel Capital Association conference in Philadelphia. Five lead investors were awarded an AANZ “scholarship” to support their attendance at the conference. Susan Iorns from AngelHQ, Blake Richardson from Flying Kiwis, George Gong from Ice Angels, Christopher Boyle from MIG Angels and Tina Jennen from Enterprise Angels have all completed reports on the conference. Some of their key insights included; no one ever thinks they changed the management of an angel backed company too soon, company boards must regularly discuss the exit, look for founders who are obsessed with making the business work, the CEO should not lead the exit, there are so many people to learn from at the ACA conference and angel investment is in the best place it’s ever been. You can access all the scholarship recipient’s reports and read more here.

Please follow and like us:

How Angels help growing entrepreneurial communities

We have interviewed Jamie Rhodes, serail entrepreneur and Angel Investor from Texas, at the Asian Business Angels Forum and AANZ Summit 2015, in Queenstown.

Jamie Rhodes answers what angels do to help grow entrepreneurial business communities.

You can meet a quality network of investors and experts in early-stage company growth, acquisition and exits in person by registering your place at the 9th Annual NZ Angel Summit 2016.

banner NZAngelSummit16

 

Please follow and like us:

What does NZ need to provide?

During the Asian Business Angels Forum and AANZ Summit 2015 we talked to Jamie Rhodes, serial entrepreneur, founder of Alliance of Texas Angel Networks and chair member of the Angel Capital Association.

In this interview Jamie Rhodes talks about what New Zealand’s entrepreneurial ecosystem needs to provide for companies which want to scale in the United Stades.

You can meet a quality network of investors and experts in early-stage company growth, acquisition and exits in person by registering your place at the 9th Annual NZ Angel Summit 2016.

banner NZAngelSummit16

Please follow and like us:

What can be learned from Silicon Valley?

The following interview with Jamie Rhodes, a serial entrepreneur and founder of Alliance of Texas Angel Networks, was conducted at the Asian Business Angels Forum and AANZ Summit 2015.

Jamie Rhodes talks about what New Zealand can learn from Silicon Valley.

You can meet a quality network of investors and experts in early-stage company growth, acquisition and exits in person by registering your place at the 9th Annual NZ Angel Summit 2016.

banner NZAngelSummit16

Please follow and like us:

#ABAF15NZ Speaker – Bill Payne

Meet the speakers #ABAF15NZ – Bill Payne

A key feature of the 2015 Asian Business Angel Forum is its international focus. The forum, bought to New Zealand by the AANZ, runs 14-16 October and has attracted leading early-stage investors from over a dozen countries.

Among a stellar group of thought-leaders the AANZ is pleased to welcome Bill Payne. A genuine rock star of angel investment. Bill is internationally recognized as one of the most senior and experienced experts in angel investment. He is an engineer, entrepreneur, angel investor and educator.

Register-now

For over three decades, Bill has successfully founded and invested in over 50 start-up companies, including Solid State Dielectrics, Inc., an electronic materials company he founded in 1971 and sold to E. I. DuPont in 1982.

Bill has delivered over 120 man-years of service on private company and non-profit boards of directors and has served as an Entrepreneur-in-Residence to;

  • Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation – 1995-2007
  • McGuire Entrepreneurship Program, University of Arizona 2004
  • BNZ-University of Auckland – 2010
  • i2E – Innovation to Enterprise, Oklahoma City – 2010 to present

He has served on the founding committee of the Angel Capital Association (US), on six university advisory boards and as a founding organizer and member of four angel groups in the US

  • Aztec Venture Network – 1999 San Diego
  • Tech Coast Angels – 2000 San Diego
  • Vegas Valley Angels – 2004 Las Vegas
  • Frontier Angel Fund – 2006 Northwest Montana

In addition to facilitating over 100 workshops and seminars on angel investing in six countries Bill has been recognized by his angel investing peers and honored with the following awards:

  • 2009 Hans Severiens Memorial Award for Outstanding Contributions to Angel Investing
  • 2010 New Zealand Arch Angel Award for his impact on angel investing in New Zealand
  • William H. Payne Active Angel Award – presented annually to the outstanding angel investor in Auckland’s ICE Angels

From 1995 to 2007 in his role with as an Entrepreneur-in-Residence with the Kauffman Foundation (Kansas City), he worked on educational programs for entrepreneurs and their investors, including eVenturing.com and the Power of Angel Investing seminar series. While with Kauffman, he was also actively engaged in the formation and startup of the Angel Capital Education Foundation (now the Angel Resource Institute) and the Angel Capital Association.

For five months in 2010, Bill served as the BNZ University of Auckland Entrepreneur-in-Residence in New Zealand.  During this service, he delivered 20 seminars, 45 public lectures and mentored 75 entrepreneurs.  The ICEHOUSE chief executive Andy Hamilton said, “We were fortunate to have had Bill here working so closely with businesses and angel groups around New Zealand.  His guidance will have a positive effect on the start-up and investment community for a long time.”

Bill graduated with BS and MS degrees in Ceramic Engineering from the University of Illinois, where he has served on the Dean’s Board of Visitors of the College of Engineering.  His eBook, the Definitive Guide to Raising Money from Angels is available on his website at www.billpayne.com. He and his wife Ann are residents of Henderson, Nevada and Whitefish, Montana.

 

 

You can meet Bill in person, along with a host of angels from New Zealand’s angel investment community and the world by securing your seat now at one the southern hemisphere’s largest international exclusive angel investor events Asian Business Angels Forum, Queenstown, New Zealand, October 14-15.

 ABAF2015, NZ

Please follow and like us:

Equitise raises $211k in first campaign

Equity crowd funding closes another deal in NZ. Equitise, together with PledgeMe and Snowball have now raised $8m for their ventures. It was clear at the recent Angel Capital Assn conference in San Diego that these platforms are bringing valuable additional funding into the early stage funding market. We need to be sure we keep reminding those taking part of the risk inherent in these investments.

Equity crowd-funding platform Equitise has closed its first campaign after successfully raising $211,000 for Tourism Radio NZ.

The company, which provides location-specific digital travel guide commentary through mobile devices in motor homes and rental cars, says it will use the cash to develop technology, expand its sales force and prepare the business for expansion into Australia.

The 30 investors that took part in the crowd-funding campaign, which valued the firm at $1.2 million, now hold a combined stake of 18.2 per cent in Tourism Radio.

The company, which had revenue of over $950,000 last year, said the investment would drive future revenue growth of 50 per cent year-on-year.

Equitise managing director Jonny Wilkinson said the platform had received a lot of interest from potential issuers since completing its first campaign.

“People have obviously seen that out first deal has closed [successfully] and that has provided some certainty and surety in people’s minds,” he said.

Equitise gained authorisation to operate from the Financial Markets Authority in December.

Wilkinson said Equitise expected to announce its second campaign within the next few weeks.

Equity crowd-funding, which became possible in New Zealand last year through a once-in-a-generation overhaul of securities legislation, allows companies to issue shares to the public through online platforms.

More than $7 million has been raised by three local equity crowd-funding providers – Snowball Effect, PledgeMe and Equitise – since August.

As published  NZ Herald 6 May 2015

Please follow and like us:

John Huston: Knowledge and Insights #AANZSummit14

Angel Association New Zealand Summit 2014

Angel Association New Zealand Annual Summit 2014 welcomed leading American Angel John Huston as keynote speaker and panel member to share his knowledge and insights with the New Zealand Angel investing community.

Read more from John Huston here:

http://www.angelassociation.co.nz/news/angel-entrepreneur-news/2014/10/angels-light-path-nz-start-ups

http://www.angelassociation.co.nz/news/2014/10/guest-post-john-huston-keynote-speaker-aanzsummit14

Download resources shared by John Huston here:

http://www.angelassociation.co.nz/resources/john-huston-presentations-documents

 

To view this video on youtube click here

ABAF2015, NZ

Please follow and like us:

Leading angel set to impart wisdom

He’s been in NZ barely a week and John May is spreading the word about the power of angel investment. He’ll be in Tauranga this week and you can catch him in Wellington, Palmerston North and Christchurch over the next fortnight.

Tauranga investors interested in learning more about the angel investment space will get an opportunity later this month when American chair-emeritus of the Angel Capital Association John May visits the region.

“There are two ways of learning about angel investing ” by doing it and by hearing from people who have done it a lot,” said Bill Murphy, executive director of Enterprise Angels, the Bay of Plenty-based group which has become one of the largest and most active angel groups in New Zealand.

“Any of us who have been involved in EA for a while will tell you that the visits of people like Bill Payne and John Huston to EA have been critical in deepening our knowledge and making us better investors.”

The Angel Association of New Zealand is bringing Mr May out from the US.

Mr May has been at the forefront of the angel investor movement and is managing partner of the New Vantage Group, which has organised five angel investing organisations in Washington, D.C. placing funds into more than 50 companies.

In addition to having chaired the national US angel association, he is a lead instructor for the “Power of Angel Investing” seminars, a programme of the Angel Resource Institute.

He is also the co-author of two books, Every Business Needs an Angel and State of the Art: An Executive Briefing on Cutting-Edge Practices in American Angel Investing. Washingtonian Magazine named Mr May one of its 100 Tech Titans of DC, and he was awarded the Hans Severiens Award for the contributions to the angel investing industry at the Angel Capital Association Summit in San Francisco in 2010.

Currently, Mr May is active in cross-border angel investing and developing angel investment ecosystems in emerging markets.

He will speak at three events in Tauranga:

-A networking event from 5pm to 7pm on Thursday, 19 February, hosted by Enterprise Angels and Priority One, at the Ignition co-working space, Ground Floor, Rydal House, Grey Street.

-A half day workshop from 9am to 12pm on Monday, 23 February, at the BaseStation, Durham Street, hosted by Enterprise Angels

-An “angel at my table” event at Tauranga Art Gallery at 5pm on the Monday.

First published on nzherald.co.nz 12 February 2015

Please follow and like us:

ACA Report 3: Corporate Acquirers & Acquisition Strategy

Another instalment from ACA Summit 2014.

This session on corporate acquirers was sponsored by Procter and Gamble. Steve Baggot represented the company on the panel. Also on the panel were Frank Ball from New Dominion Angels who moderated the session. Michael Loria from IBM and Peter Rosenblum from Foley Hoag Law Firm also spoke.

CORPORATE ACQUIRERS – how to engage, deal sizes, commoneerrors and what breaks deals

Steve Baggot from Proctor and Gamble, said they do a deal every three days. JVs, licensing etc

Foley Hoag – Peter Rosenblum noted his firm help clients create strategy around deals

IBM’s – Michael Loria said his firm try to approach opportunities without determining structure of the deal until they understand the opportunity. More and more they are seeing the need to incubate an opportunity they have spotted. Sometimes they may buy an “option opportunity” in that business and often want access to customer base and sales team. They tend to “either have to drive or absolutely sit in the back seat”. This then means they can have quite a long relationship with the opportunity before they buy it.

Building a relationship is vital. It’s a long process. Using relationships as a runway to an acquisition.

What happens to the people? At P&G many people are there from acquisitions.

Most of the opportunities they are looking for are ‘what is keeping people up at night’ – problems the company is trying to solve. Steve likes the things that are serendipitous, but these still have to meet the test of strategy and business fit.

Law firms like Foley Hoag often help with the match making between venture and acquirer. But specialised law firms are better at the strategy than the match making. They can also help with investment banker identification. But be wary of whether you actually need these guys.

How do acquirers communicate their needs? Check their website. But this is generally only a slice of what they need. Always be on the look out for big acquirers looking to Invite people to share what they are working on.

It’s often a good idea to contact regional offices. Most will have entres into the acquiring dept of the big corporate. Odds of reaching the relevant person or even the acquiring team or department on your own are about zero. Look for someone to provide an introduction.

Make sure your legal or investment banking teams have credibility with the acquirer. Make sure they know the acquirers strategy and market, intimately and practically. Be wary of the business development guys at investment banking firms. They can become conflicted. And be sure, in the same way you appreciate the conflicting drivers when you are talking to the sales team at a corporate acquirer too.
Neither care about how big the company is that they are acquiring.

Almost all corporate acquirers won’t be getting into DD until they are quite sure it is a strategic fit. Then if it is a fit “about 10 billion” people will show up on your door step. And will they require tons of data. Internal data and intel about the company and about your market.

They will then review the business fit to be sure the acquirer can extract the value. Some deals take 21 days, some two years.

One of the first questions to ask a potential acquirer is do you have people and budget for acquisition – you need a “yes” to both questions and dig a little deeper on this too. Be sure the answer is “yes”. Strategic and resource fit are important.

A lot of deals fall over on IP issues. Sometimes trade marks. Corporate acquirers generally want all IP in the company but not always. Software business – big bump in a deal is often caused if the relevant software is open source. Most big companies don’t like it. Contracts are another bump in the road. Distribution relationship can be a potential land-mine if it’s with a competitor of the acquirer. Even some existing customers can be a problem to an acquirer, especially if you can’t get rid of them easily so that your acquirer can sell to their own customer base.

As an Angel Investor director you have to help your companies understand how they will manage the business while acquisition is going on. So often the company falls over while a deal is being done… often running out of cash because they neglect sales generation.

The modern style of doing a deal is to set up an electronic data room. Be sure you know which things you should and shouldn’t show the acquirer. Some things they shouldn’t see until they have bought the business

Valuation is the biggest derailer. Passion gets in the way of a clear eyed view of the real value. Based on data and research plans. Ask yourself, how do we learn together to get to an aligned view on valuation. Look at comparables in the market. And look at the risk. What is it worth to us. But every case is specific.

The heart of the issue for Angel’s is  – what can we expect our Investee to do in the buyers environment – not necessarily what it is doing in its current environment.

It’s not about what you have but how the buyer might look at it.

On my way home from the ACA Summit 2014, via Boulder I visited Trimble Navigation – employing over 3000 people, selling over 500 products in 35 countries and making GPS receivers, laser rangefinders and inertial navigation systems. Trimble have acquired 80 (yup, 80!) companies in the last 4-5 years. Some of these from NZ. They just recently acquired an Auckland company for $10m+. So the message is clear, American buyers are active! Good news for New Zealand Angels and their Investees.

– Suse Reynolds, from Washington, DC, USA

Please follow and like us:

ACA Report 2: John Huston on exit strategy “Driving lucrative exits is not a quick flip…”

John Huston led a session at the 2014 ACA conference (www.angelcapitalassociation.org/2014summit/) in Washington, DC, on “Driving Lucrative Investments from the Board room”.  His focus on exit strategy was clear and loud.

John, ex-Chairman of the Angel Capital Association & the Angel Resource Institute, is quite literally a walking wikipedia of Angel intel and an energetic presenter. He founded his Angel investment group, Ohio TechAngels, in 2004 after retiring from a 30 year banking career and is currently investing out of their third fund focused solely on Ohio-based technology start-ups. At 282 members it is one of the largest groups in North America.

We will be welcoming John Huston to New Zealand in October 2014 at the #AANZ Summit14 at Orakei Bay, Auckland. Register for the Summit today to hear from John in person, places are limited so be quick.

John started his ACA 2014 presentation advising “great exits start with exit-goal congruence, and therefore it is important to give founders the heads up this is where you are heading from the get go. You are both going to be building financial and entrepreneurial wealth.”

“Your message regarding exit-strategy to founders: if you want $3-5m in your pocket in about 5 years and you’ll be working 80 hour weeks. Minimum wage!”

As their angel investor you want them to see their baby grow up and be successful.

He then asked the question Angels should all ask themselves: Are you growing your “ABC” (angel backed company) to attract financial or strategic buyers? Financial exits which are 6-8x and based on ebita take too long. This is NOT what you are after. Strategic exits is about building real value.

Are VCs required for the exit? He had no good or bad answer. But noted that VC’s goals are rarely aligned with angels. They are required to balance their duty to LPs against ABC shareholders and will generally want all ABC directors off the board. And always ask is the VC director you are getting the one that PERSONALLY drove the last exit. Chances are he didn’t. VC’s are motivated by raising the next fund… and what metrics they need to demonstrate to do this.

Publicly owned companies also have very different goals from an ABC. Maxing shareholder value etc not selling the company. Share performance vs sector performance etc, ie: not big multiples.

Angels buy and sell our shares at a negotiated price and do the following:

  • Raise follow on rounds
  • Help recruit team
  • Replace CEO
  • Build strategic value
  • Drive lucrative exits (which are NOT the same as ‘quick flip’ strategies)

Other gems of Angel wisdom from John included:

Dilution kills you. So be as capital efficient as possible.

Angel Investor directors need tools training and aligned expectations.

Build a capital access plan. If you need VCs you are adding another layer of risk. You will have to increase the price and value enormously to outweigh the dilution.

Know the difference between an IRR and multiples.

Take an inventory – your strategic assets (what you own) and capability (what you do).

Identify potential acquirers. Prioritize a maximum of 5 identified by their ability to pay $50m for the company and their willingness to bid. Then work on their willingness. Can you sell anything to them and then identify the customers that will impress them? Not every customer will have the same value to the acquirer.

Track TSB (targeted strategic buyer) and attract their attention.

Engage a banker. If needed.

Have all directors take more of a role in the sale of the business so that CEO can keep driving the sales.

Alternative strategy is “build a great company and they will come!” which is not an exit strategy that has any more chance of success than build a great product and they will come.

John concluded with a bunch of questions Ohio Tech Angels have identified to ask founders, with number one on the list being the need for them to answer: Why would an acquirer want to buy your company?

– Suse Reynolds, from Washington, DC, USA

Please follow and like us:

ACA Report 1: Dave McClure “Write a small cheques & spend time”

The AANZ’s role includes curating intel from the rest of the world for the use and benefit of New Zealand’s Angel Investors. The recent 2014 Angel Capital Association Summit (www.angelcapitalassociation.org/2014summit/) in Washington, DC, was a great opportunity to do just that.

Billed as the largest gathering of angels in the world it bought together top insights into this rapidly changing environment. Features included how social media is affecting the early-stage landscape, investment best practices, innovations in deal terms, exits – and how rules and legislation from Washington is affecting our world (and what we can do to change it). 

A highlight of the event were words of wisdom from one of its headlining presenters Dave McClure of 500 Startups.

Dave’s session was fascinating.  He is the founder of 500 Startups; a seed fund and accelerator based in Mountain View, California and one extremely colourful character. Everyone was rather wide-eyed with anticipation about how many times he would, to quote many of them, “drop the F-bomb”. He visited New Zealand in 2013 with his international Geeks on a Plane.

What follows here, and in my other report posts are notes written while attending the ACA presentations.

Dave started with $300k when he first began investing in startups

He invested very small amounts. And was very much learning on the fly. He made 13-15 investments and had 3 exits.

This took place over 4-5 years and he learned that “most of the time you’re wrong”! Getting something back is good.

But doing a lot of little investments was a good strategy. It allowed him to explore ideas and companies he pretty much stumbled into.

Then the Founders Fund gave him $2m and two companies have delivered 100x.

Dave is firmly of the view that the minimum portfolio size must be at least 20. And you must be prepared to admit you’re wrong… A LOT.

“Diversification is the one and only message I would leave you with.”

If you have $200k to invest, then invest the first $100k in $5k amounts into 20 companies.

Save the second $100k to identify the ones kicking on and do some follow on in slightly larger amounts.

He’s had lots of small exits and learned that valuations matter a lot. So keep them as low as possible.

Don’t play for ownership play for valuation.

Dave had a interesting DD tip which he’s learned makes a a great deal of sense – there is more to be gained from looking for upside opportunity than looking for downside risk. So don’t spend too much time looking what can go wrong.  Explore the extent to which this deal can genuinely disrupt a market and make lots of money from it.

In his view Dave figures if the founding team can make a product, sell it and manage costs you’re onto something.
Even when “we might lose a dollar but might make ten” still looking at upside… this means even if the DD shows its dodgy, do it!

Dave believes the angel and startup industry is getting easier to work with. Lots more visibility on deals and investors.
And “we are getting smarter… not much, but a little”. There is so much more information out there now and this helps

Customer acquisition is getting easier.

Dave also recommended his fellow American Investors look closer at potential in international markets and gave Africa as an example – which has 20 of the world’s fastest growing countries. In next 5-10 years the whole world will have access to Internet.

Other bullet point gems of wisdom included:

Companies are going to fail on smaller and smaller budgets.

Syndicates are easier to get started. Much easier to organise and pull together than raising an investment fund.

Dave suggested most of problem is with the angels. But we are also the solution. We should be investing smaller cheques earlier and let the ones not making it fail and follow the ones kicking on

He lamented the fact that there are “lots of people with money who aren’t giving it to entrepreneurs”!

Angels and investors are part of the solution… write a small cheque and spend some time with the founder he urged us.

This next point is a good one… and bears reading carefully. Dave made it well.

“Ownership matters on a relative basis from the first cheque to the second cheque. At the first cheque you are investing without much information about the likelihood of success. You want more ownership when the perception of value is increasing but the price is not. So you are looking for where the risk has reduced but the rest of the market does not know this. You go hard here and go for ownership rather than valuation. You get to arbitrage that gap.”

Dave said you should look for product data which is backward looking to validate its quality and the market. If the product is good then the team should be too. If product is fucked up then the team probably is too.  (F-bomb dropped at last!)

Angels should be the Henry Ford for investment. There is a lot of talent out there and we should be giving it money.

– Suse Reynolds, from Washington, DC, USA

Please follow and like us:

Lead Partners

NZTE NZVIF PWC

Expert Partner

AVID “FNZC.jpg”

AANZ Summit Sponsors

Callaghan Innovation “UniServices” Kiwinet “Spark”