Get in quickly – AANZ Summit registrations open!

Diversity … making a difference and delivering outcomes

Last year we celebrated a decade of angel investing in New Zealand. And it was terrific to have that line up with some impressive success for angel backed companies with PowerbyProxi selling to Apple, Publons selling to Clarivate and ImeasureU selling to Oxford Metrics. Last year was also record year for ‘dollars into deals’ with a 26% increase on the previous year’s investment at $86m.

We are genuinely creating value for New Zealand and New Zealanders. At this year’s summit we will focus on amping up that value through the power of diversity. Why and how does a more feminine approach, both as founders and investors, add value? What values do different ethnicities bring to angel backed ventures to increase the prospect of success? Why is it important we include millennials in our ventures?

It’s all about making a difference… diversity and inclusion delivers higher value outcomes.

The 11th Annual NZ Angel Summit, 1/2 November, is being held at Marlborough Vintners, 10 minutes drive from Blenheim and in amongst the vineyards. We deliberately choose smaller intimate venues to ensure we create the right atmosphere for relaxed and rewarding conversations. Our last three summits have sold out as we prioritise places for those ‘doing deals’.

On the first morning we set the context for the two days by reviewing the year and have a session on the values that drive angel investors and how these impact on success. In the afternoon we apply these insights to the more practical aspects of angel investment with sessions on the new industry standard term sheet, how to ensure alignment with follow-on funding sources and dig into the government’s plans to support our endeavours, particularly with respect to tax reform. On Friday morning we focus on our own heroes and hear first-hand from some of our founders and investors who getting real traction offshore. All of this will be shot through with input from successful women and millennials in our community and deep engagement with Maori and our Asian investor migrant community.

Click here to register

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Treatment of women & diversity in angel investment

Shabby, unkind and unprofessional treatment of women by men (and sometimes by other women) whether in venture capital or more broadly is unacceptable. While women have had the rough end of the stick for hundreds of years, being treated fairly and kindly should not be gender specific.

It is not about being a woman or a man or even religion or ethnicity. It’s about the values we choose to live by and which values give us a greater crack at success – however we define success!

How we treat each other and the importance of diversity is about a set of values and two values in particular – kindness and respect.

Supporting and scaling start-ups is no walk in the park. It’s often challenging and down right terrifying – for founders and investors. The fear of failure and rejection is always skulking in the shadows of fund raising, closing a sales deal and hiring senior employees. It’s anxiety inducing.

More kindness and respect would not go amiss. The AANZ believes both are key components of success, particularly when it comes to successfully scaling high growth startups.

We need to acknowledge that tough conversations are often necessary in our world. These may feel unkind but the pain can be minimised if respect and empathy – without bias – are at the heart of these conversations too.

Values complimenting kindness also support the importance of diversity. Kindness requires open-mindedness, curiosity and exploring different points of view. Successful founders live these values and these values are at the heart of the informed pivot and the ability to create and build value.

Kindness must underpin ensuring there is diversity in our deal flow, at our events and in our governance. Diversity mustn’t be about tokenism or ticking a box. Delivering diversity is about trying and looking harder to ensure it exists. It’s about valuing people to create value. We should select women (or Maori or Chinese or Buddhist) founders, speakers and board members based on their ability to shine and help others to shine. To do anything other than this is unkind – to everyone, and especially to the ‘box tickee’.

The AANZ Code of Conduct can be found here. We have added two clauses to the behaviours we expect. They are to be:
– Kind and respectful, and
– Supportive of diversity

As an industry we take responsibility, individually and collectively, for reflecting the behaviours set out in the Code of Conduct. We will talk quietly to those we are worried might not be reflecting these. We are not advocates of naming and shaming. That’s not kind or respectful.

The AANZ Constitution, however, makes it clear that our members must be “of good standing in the angel investment community” and there is provision for members to be expelled when this is no longer the case. The profound potential for common good inherent in angel investment is squandered when the self-interest reflected in unkindness is prioritised.

We all have circles of inspiration and impact – we must be the change we want to see – it’s powerful stuff.

Onwards…

Suse Reynolds
Executive Director

“Constant kindness can accomplish much. As the sun makes ice melt, kindness causes misunderstanding, mistrust, and hostility to evaporate.” – Albert Schweitzer

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Apple robot up for angel investment

A Tauranga company is ready to take its apple packing robotics offshore and help remove the headache of finding staff to do mundane work.
The automated apple packing machines place apples in trays ‘‘colour up’’ with the stems aligned, using sensors, software and electromechanical technology, and are expected to remove some of the monotonous work that apple packhouses find difficult to staff.

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Hawkes Bay Angel Summit deemed a success for national and international attendees

The Angel Association of New Zealand’s annual Angel Summit in Hawke’s Bay last week was “brilliant” in every way, says executive director Suse Reynolds.
“The weather was gorgeous, the food was gorgeous and the people were wonderful,” she said.
She said it was a very productive two days for the 120 delegates, with some of the key issues being collaboration, the importance of New Zealand Inc and balancing investment with return – the conflicting need for return on investment with wider economic/social goals.
She said the Black Barn venue helped foster good relations between attendees.
“Business is all about people and it is important to build the foundations of trust.”
Angels flew in from throughout New Zealand and overseas.
“The New Zealand Angel Summit has a reputation for being the world’s best angel conference destination. Last year when we had it in Queenstown we had 50 international visitors from a dozen different countries. We didn’t quite manage it this time around because last year’s was the Asian business angels forum and this year we were back to our New Zealand Angel Summit, but we still had Australian’s Chinese, Americans, Canadians and one Skyped-in from Zurich.”
Summit activities included an address from Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce, a visit to Rockit Apples’ packing shed and a dozen investment-related presentations.
One of New Zealand’s most prolific angel investors, Trevor Dickinson, was awarded the prestigious Arch Angel Award in Hawke’s Bay, which recognises individuals who have “steadfastly championed the cause of angel investment and investors”.
He has made more than 50 investments in early-stage and startup companies – the vast majority of which are angel-backed firms from throughout the country. He is on the board of Wellington-based angel investor network Angel HQ, and received the organisation’s first lifetime membership based on the value of his investments made through the group.
Angel HQ manager Dave Allison said his contribution to the angel investment community was marked.
“The energy and enthusiasm he brings is extraordinary, whether it’s on the boards of companies, or advising entrepreneurs, or making deals happen by bringing people together,” he said.
The English-born former geologist worked in the UK oil and gas industry before mortgaging his house to develop state-of-the-art measurement-while-drilling technology.
GeoLink success allowed him to retire to New Zealand where he was a founding investor in startups including Lightning Lab, Wipster, HydroWorks, Nyriad, Cloud Cannon, 8i, Flick Electric and Times-7.
Former Arch Angel winners also include The Warehouse founder and long-time angel investor Sir Stephen Tindall and Andy Hamilton, chief executive of Auckland-based incubator and business educator The Icehouse.
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‘The jockey’ key for angel investing

Investing in high growth companies is like a long horse race and understanding the jockey you’re betting on is key for angel investors, says veteran Canadian angel investor Ross Finlay.

Finlay, co-founder and director of the First Angel Network Association in Atlantic Canada, is one of the international speakers at the annual Angel Summit in New Zealand underway in Napier.

He said before angels commit their money they have to pick the right jockey and the earlier stage the company is, the more that matters.

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Investible launches education program for first time angel investors to democratise Australia’s investing community

Australian startup generator Investible has today launched First Angel, a new education program for first time angel investors. The 12 month program aims to fill the knowledge gap of local angel investors in the early stage investing process.
The First Angel program was launched by Investible cofounders Trevor Folsom and Creel Price to democratise angel investing in Australia and generate a more diverse investing community.

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Lead Partners

NZTE NZVIF PWC

Expert Partner

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AANZ Summit Sponsors

Callaghan Innovation “UniServices” Kiwinet “Spark”