Puawaitanga & Kotahitanga Award Winners 2018

This year the Angel Association New Zealand’s Puawaitanga Award recognises the founder and investor-director who best exemplify what can be achieved when committed people draw on their collective skills and experience. This award celebrates an angel-backed venture achieving world-class success. This venture has excellent governance, a compelling business proposition and a well-defined strategy for exponential returns.

Puawaitanga – ‘best return on integrated goals’.

The Kotahitanga Award recognises those people in the angel community who have made an outstanding contribution to the industry. It acknowledges those who have selflessly given personal time and energy for a sustained period and contributed to the professionalism, profile and reputation of angel investment in New Zealand.

Kotahitanga – ‘unity and a shared sense of working together’.

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The Puawaitanga Award has been presented to Dexibit’s founder Angie Judge and investor-director, Dana McKenzie.

Dexibit analyzes visitor behavior and venue performance at the world’s visitor attraction institutions such as museums and galleries. Since Angie Judge founded Dexibit in 2015, the company has secured customers like the National Gallery in the UK and The Smithsonian in the USA and, here in New Zealand, the Auckland Art Gallery and Te Papa. Dexibit has won two prestigious High Tech Awards for Innovative Software and Best Technical Solution for the Creative Sector and been a finalist in a number of other categories. Dana McKenzie has Chaired the Board of Dexibit for the last three years and is a true champion for the company and its team, including Angie.

In making the award, Angel Association Chair, John O’Hara said Angie and Dana are great examples of what alignment and mutual support can achieve.

“No one scales value in a high-growth tech company on their own. To get traction both the founder and the investors need to be committed to the same end-point. This has clearly been the case with Dexibit. Dana and Angie have been working together to generate stunning progress in terms of revenue generation, customer acquisition and to secure capital to amplify that growth to support Dexibit to generate exponential returns for the investors and just as importantly, for the New Zealand economy,” he said.

The recipient of the Kotahitanga Award is Matu Managing Partner, Greg Sitters.

Greg has been involved with capital raising for early-stage deep-tech ventures in New Zealand for over a decade. He was an early employee at Sparkbox Ventures and then worked for its successor GD1, before setting up Matu. Matu was founded earlier this year to provide seed and early stage capital for disruptive scientific and IP rich startups. Greg has given countless hours of his time to literally hundreds of budding and early founders, including in his tenure as a long standing member of the Return on Science and Uniservices’ Investment Committees. Greg is a founding member of the Angel Association and served on the Council since its inception in 2008. In this role he has given freely of his time to dozens of professional development initiatives and to represent the early stage industry at events not only all over New Zealand but around the world.

“Greg exemplifies the generosity of spirit that imbues the New Zealand angel community. His depth of knowledge about what it takes to scale a deep tech venture is unsurpassed and has been invaluable to companies like HumbleBee, Lanaco, Objective Acuity and many more,” said John O’Hara.

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On track for another record year

First half year results show angels are investing at rates on a par with previous years. The upward trajectory continues. It’s likely the formal part of the market will hit $100m into high growth start-ups this year.

Reporting on the activity of its members tracked by the NZ Venture Investment Fund, Angel Association Chair John O’Hara said $30.8m dollars was invested in 46 deals in the first six months of the year compared to $20.2m into 29 deals in the same period last year.

More detail and deeper insights can be found at www.pwc.co.nz/startupmagazine in the second edition of Startup Investment New Zealand; a collaboration between Angel Assn and PwC.

Mr O’Hara noted there is always a substantial uplift in activity in the second half of the year, in part inspired by two of the country’s larger angel networks, Ice Angels and AngelHQ, holding their annual venture showcases in September.

“This year Ice Angels’ showcase attracted 1000 guests and that level of enthusiasm has been reflected in capital commitments to the ventures presenting. AngelHQ’s showcase attendance numbers were also up,” said Mr O’Hara.

“We are seeing increasing valuations and amounts raised, and in many cases, start-ups are now appearing to be fully valued. While this is positive it comes with some challenges,” said Mr O’Hara.

“Start-ups that are too well funded can lose their edge and correspondingly high valuations put pressure on founders to deliver the requisite valuation uplift to ensure the next funding round is successful,” he noted.

These sorts of issues were discussed at the Angel Association’s first ever event for founders and investor-directors held the day before the industry’s annual summit in Blenheim on Wednesday 31 October 2018. Called “The Runway”, the day-long event brought together over 35 founders of high growth ventures and the angels who have backed them. As well as building a cohort of like-minded founders who support each other as their ventures scale, the initiative began to build tighter alignment and awareness of what it takes to scale an angel backed company.

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Investors have confidence in startup futures

The October issue of Startup Investment New Zealand Magazine is now available here.

In this edition, we shine a spotlight on Kiwi businesses that have earned a place on the world stage. To be successful, Kiwi startups have always had to think and act global from the outset but there’s now a number of factors helping these startups succeed in offshore markets, and often much earlier in their journey. We’re seeing a developing ecosystem of support including government agencies, networks and people with experience at scaling global businesses, as well as investors who have the confidence to support these innovative companies.

The data is supporting this investor confidence. Five times the number of startup organisations successfully raised over $1 million from local investors in the first half of 2018 verse the same period last year, according to the latest Young Company Finance Index. This year almost half of deals are co invested by two or more Angel clubs and funds. Why is the formula to achieve global success so critical? It means little old New Zealand can produce valuable companies winning on the global stage, which attracts investors and ultimately builds prosperity for us as a country.

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Into the dragon’s den with New Zealand’s million-dollar investments

Hundreds of New Zealand’s wealthiest investors gathered for the 2018 Flux Demo Day last week for a night of wining, dining, and million-dollar business investments. Jihee Junn went along to watch this year’s plucky startups pitch it out.

“The first rule of investing is: don’t leave the table when the food’s being served!” a jolly looking man at my table exclaimed. We were halfway through the night’s events when platters of braised beef, roast potatoes and Akaroa salmon were brought out to the room’s 400 or so investors. As we dug into our family-style meals, passing along giant plates of food from left to right, I asked some of my fellow diners – all older, wealthier, and a lot more male than me – for their thoughts on the startups that had pitched so far. On the whole, their responses were akin to a placid shrug.

“They were okay,” said one man, who told me his day job was working at a private investment firm. Those sitting next to him nodded in agreement. “I’m not really here to invest tonight, but if I was, there probably hasn’t been anything yet to make me want to get out my wallet.”

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Third annual ‘Investor’s Guide to the NZ Technology Sector’

Rising domestic investment in New Zealand’s early-stage technology companies is creating more opportunities for follow-on investment from a growing number of international investors. This is according to the third annual Investor’s Guide to the New Zealand Technology Sector published jointly by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) and theTechnology Investment Network (TIN).

The guide showcases New Zealand’s diverse range of high growth technology companies, innovation capabilities and supportive business environment, and presents a compelling case for investment in New Zealand’s technology sector.

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How do you handle a founders break-up?

Co-founder splits are seldom discussed, but happen more often than you’d think. Flux Accelerator partner Barnaby Marshall shares what he’s learnt from his experiences managing a start-up portfolio and provide some insights into how to prepare for the worst (while still expecting the best).

The fact is, of 100 companies that the Icehouse has funded through our various investment entities since 2012, 35 percent of them have had a founder leave the company.

Most of those have left within the first two years of our investment. Some of these have been very messy, some have been more civil, but in all cases they have cost time and money: the two most precious resources for any startup. Add to that the emotional stress and you have a recipe to rock even the most resilient founders, and in some cases — almost be a lethal blow to the business.

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Startup Genome and the Global Entrepreneurship Network Launch the Global Startup Ecosystem Report 2018

Released at the Global Entrepreneurship Congress (GEC) in Istanbul, GSER 2018 features strategic startup, investment and policy insights from over 10,000 founders in 60 ecosysytems – including New Zealand.

With insights ranging from the fast-growing dominance of ICT verticals to the filling of critical gaps in Success Factors both funding and startups, the Global Startup Ecosystems Report (GSER) 2018 continues to present thought-leadership and knowledge building driven by the world’s largest primary ecosystem research, Voice of the Entrepreneur. This is where we find out what it takes to build dynamic startup ecosystems with both local and global resonance and which cities around the world are doing it best.

Produced in partnership between Startup Genome and the Global Entrepreneurship Network (GEN) this year’s Global Startup Ecosystems Report launches at the Global Entrepreneurship Congress in Istanbul – signaling a strong commitment to advancing a greater understanding of startup ecosystems and the global network of capital and connections that drive them.

“We’ve now entered the Third Wave of innovation – where our global startup community is disrupting industries by combining technology with deep industry expertise. This is creating a potentially game-changing opportunity for smaller, less mature startup ecosystems that can now build out competitive advantage at a global level by focusing on their DNA and legacy strengths,” shares Startup Genome CEO and co-founder JF Gauthier.

A fitting occasion for the launch of this collaborative report, the Global Entrepreneurship Congress gathers thousands of entrepreneurs, investors, researchers, policymakers and other startup champions from more than 170 countries to identify new ways of helping founders start and scale new ventures around the world.

“Research in the field is vital to shaping the interventions necessary to empower entrepreneurs around the world,” said Jonathan Ortmans, president of the Global Entrepreneurship Network. “As thousands of startup champions gather this week to explore innovative approaches, efforts such as the Global Startup Ecosystem Report help us become better informed about what is needed.”

Incorporating data from Crunchbase and Orb Intelligence, as well as the voices of over 10,000 founders from 24 countries worldwide and counting – including some of New Zealand’s top startups like Flick Electric, Fuel 50 and Nyriad – GSER 2018 presents an incisive look at over 60 ecosystems. Through an analysis of startup output and legacy traits, it identifies the industries where each ecosystem has the most potential to build the vibrant economy for which it is uniquely positioned.

This year, GSER the report takes a close look at key sub-sectors such as Advanced Manufacturing & Robotics, Agtech, A.I., Big Data & Analytics, Life Sciences and Cybersecurity, as well as new technologies in education, health, advertising and finance. The sub-sectors in focus point towards imminent entrepreneurial revolutions. Thanks to SpaceX we may already have a car in space – but will we have greater diversity and value distribution on the ground and in our startup ecosystems? These are among key qualitative issues that GSER 2018 also looks at.

In the New Zealand ecosystem in particular, GSER provides a detailed look at the following subsectors: agtech and new food, health and life sciences and govtech.

Angel Association NZ has been delighted to partner with over a dozen ecosystem participants, including NZ Trade and Enterprise, Callaghan Innovation, the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment, the tech and founder incubators, NZX and others to bring a wealth of insight to the New Zealand findings.

Commenting on the value of the report, outgoing AANZ Chair Marcel van den Assum said that not only did the report raise New Zealand’s profile with the 60+ other ecosystems also taking part but it provided insights into where we are best placed to focus our resources to enhance the impact of New Zealand startups and technology.

Download the full report here: www.startupgenome.com/report2018.

 

ABOUT US

The Angel Association of New Zealand (AANZ)

The Angel Association is an organisation that aims to increase the quantity, quality and success of angel investments in New Zealand and in doing so create a greater pool of capital for innovative start-up companies. It was established in 2008 to bring together New Zealand angels and early-stage funds. AANZ currently has 30 members representing over 700 individual angels associated with New Zealand’s key angel networks and funds.

Startup Genome
Startup Genome works to increase the success rate of startups and improve the performance of startup ecosystems globally. Fueled by the Voice of the Entrepreneur – the world’s largest primary research conducted with more than 10,000 startups annually – Startup Genome advises leaders of innovation ministries, agencies and organizations supporting startups. It brings data-driven, actionable insights, clarity and focus needed to produce more scale-ups, jobs and economic growth worldwide. Visit www.startupgenome.com for more and stay up to date on Twitter or Medium.

The Global Entrepreneurship Network

The Global Entrepreneurship Network operates a platform of programs in 170 countries aimed at making it easier for anyone, anywhere to start and scale a business. By fostering deeper cross border collaboration and initiatives between entrepreneurs, investors, researchers, policymakers and entrepreneurial support organizations, GEN works to fuel healthier start and scale ecosystems that create more jobs, educate individuals, accelerate innovation and strengthen economic growth. For more, visit www.genglobal.org and Follow GEN on Twitter.

ENDS

For interviews and further enquiries, please contact us:

Dinika Govender
Communications, Startup Genome
[email protected]

Jessica Wray Bradner

Communications, GEN
[email protected]

Suse Reynolds,

AANZ executive director
mob: 021 490 974 or email: [email protected]

Marcel van den Assum,

AANZ chair and 2015 Arch Angel
mob: 021 963 459 or email: [email protected]  

 

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NZ Startup Community Vibrant and internationally Competitive

The recent Angel Association and PwC release of data reveals a new record of $86 million flowing into early-stage businesses across the country.The recent Angel Association and PwC release of data reveals a new record of $86 million flowing into early-stage businesses across the country.

NZVCA Executive Director Colin McKinnon says: ‘The reported growth in investment dollars was due to an increasing number of larger deals in 2017, compared to the year before. The increased deal size indicates a maturing of the early-stage market. We are seeing angel investment building larger companies that are capable of attracting international investment.

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Angel investment rises 26% to reach record level

Startups in New Zealand received an unprecedented level of funding last year, with $86 million flowing into early-stage businesses across the country. That’s according to Startup Investment NZ, published by PwC New Zealand, the Angel Association of New Zealand (AANZ) and the New Zealand Venture Investment Fund (NZVIF).

“It’s exciting to see such a large number of deals coming through to support early-stage companies. We’re seeing investment levels that are almost three times what we saw just five years ago” said Anand Reddy, Partner at PwC New Zealand.

John O’Hara, AANZ Chair, endorsed this sentiment noting that membership of angel networks continues to grow with a new network established in Marlborough last year and a budding network getting started in the Hawkes Bay.

Established networks like Ice Angels in Auckland, AngelHQ in Wellington and Enterprise Angels in Tauranga are also experiencing growing memberships.

Driving the growth in investment dollars is an increasing number of larger deals in 2017, compared to the year before. The number of deals in 2017 held steady at 111 – one lower than the 12 months previous – the total amount invested has risen by $18 million, a 26% increase.

Offering some insight on the larger number of dollars being invested in a similar number of deals, John O’Hara suggested it reflected a maturing ecosystem.

“A number of the ventures angels have backed are now looking for larger capital injections to fuel their growth. With a thin VC industry, it’s not surprising we are seeing larger deal sizes.

John also offered a word of caution to investors and founders.

“The market’s a little frothy right now. We’re seeing some strong valuations. Entrepreneurs have to be sure they’re not setting the bar too high with their forecast results. If they fail to meet these, it’ll make it make it harder for them to get the next round of funding.

“And investors will be similarly impacted. Flat and down rounds do not impact well on portfolio return prospects.”

Click here to find out more about how the startup sector is evolving, and where it’s heading next.

Click here to dive into the data about this asset class.

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The network effect: NZ angel networks drive funding

Of the $86 million invested into young companies in 2017, over half ($49 million) came from angel investment networks, rather than individual funds or institutional investment.

“The strength of our angel investment networks in New Zealand is growing every day, which helps to explain why they’re responsible for a growing share of overall funding” says AANZ Chair John O’Hara.

“They’re responsible for over double the funding that’s coming through the next most-popular channel of angel funds.”

Raising funds from angel networks can take a little longer than other sources of early stage funding (such as mico-VCs and high networth individuals) given that sometimes over a dozen individual investors are collaborating to complete DD and gather the investment. Angel networks also tend to be run with a large component of voluntary input so founders and lead investors need to be committed project managers.

John notes that not only do networks tend to bring a larger pool of connections and expertise than single source funding options, they bring deeper reserves of connections for follow on funding.

“Angels are inveterate travellers and networkers and have connections in markets across the world which can be tapped for sales channels, in-market insights as well as follow on funding recommendations,” said John.

“Nothing beats getting on a plane with a line-up of carefully targeted meetings. New Zealand founders and investor directors need to spend more time in-market and be preparing for the founder to be based there,” John added.

He concluded by noting that lining up an in-market Board member was also an important component of scaling into offshore markets.

Click here to find out more about how the startup sector is evolving, and where it’s heading next.

Click here to dive into the data about this asset class.

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Software the top sector for NZ angel investors

More than half the investment made in early stage companies in New Zealand last year was in the software and services space (53.8%), followed by 17% in technology hardware and equipment.

“Technology is increasingly the engine of growth for all companies, regardless of size” explains PWC’s Anand Reddy.

“It’s no surprise that it’s these areas where the most activity is happening and where angel and early-stage investors are putting their energy. This reflects global trends too. Data generated by Crunchbase notes that the software and services remains the dominant sector for investment.”

Speaking personally, John O’Hara said that his own portfolio leant towards software generated ventures.

“I am particularly proud of Ask Nicely, which produces software for NPS (net promoter score) collection and analysis. This company has already generated tangible returns for a number of the early angel investors. The company is now scaling into the US, with the founder moving to Portland, Oregon in the last couple of months.

“New Zealanders have a knack for practical problem solution and we are increasingly seeing them turn this knack into compelling business opportunities,” said O’Hara.

Click here to find out more about how the startup sector is evolving, and where it’s heading next.

Click here to dive into the data about this asset class.

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2018 New Zealand Hi-Tech Awards – Finalists Announced

A record number of people gathered across Auckland, Christchurch and Wellington today to hear the finalists in the 2018 NZ Hi-Tech Awards announced.

Entries this year have come in from right across the country and this is reflected in the line up of finalists this year, according to Jen Rutherford, Chair of the Hi-Tech Trust, who says the standard of entries is the highest ever seen in the history of the Awards.

“This year’s finalists span the full spectrum of the hi-tech sector and the country. For 2018 we have made a really big push to ensure even greater diversity across the board and it’s great to see so many areas of the country represented, as well as a huge increase in the number of finalists led by women. The number of finalists with female CEO’s has almost doubled year-on-year. Whilst we are not there yet, we are moving in the right direction. Our industry is truly in great shape,” says Rutherford

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A Day in the Life: Josh Comrie

The portfolio life doesn’t choose you. You choose the portfolio life. And that’s what serial entrepreneur, angel investor and general over-achiever Josh Comrie has done. This is how he balances everything.

What time do you wake up?

I start the day at 5 or 5.30am, unless I retired after 11, in which case I’ll treat myself to a 6am sleep in.

Do you have any morning rituals?

Several! First, I make my bed. Fully. I’ve only recently appreciated how important this is:

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New Zealand researchers developing non-addictive alternative to opioids as an anaesthetic

Kiwi researchers developing a new anaesthetic as an alternative to highly-addictive opioids have been given an $8 million boost.

The Medical Research Commercialisation Fund today announced an investment of $8 million in Series A funding to allow the developers to set up Kea Therapeutics Ltd, an early stage pharmaceutical company which is developing the drug.

Kea Therapeutics is a spin-off from the Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre and Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences Waikato Clinical Campus, University of Auckland.

The investment, the first from the fund for a New Zealand company, would allow the company to commercialise its substitute for strong opioids in a range of clinical scenarios from pre-hospital to post-surgical pain relief and sedation.

Medical Research Commercialisation Fund investment manager Duncan Mackintosh said non-opioid pain relief was urgently needed for the management of severe pain.

“Opioids have a range of unwanted side effects, are highly-addictive and are causing a global epidemic of dependency on this type of pain medication. Kea’s approach offers the potential for a safer alternative to opioids for the management of pain that is not addictive and could be used in a wider range of clinical settings.”
Anaesthetist, Professor Jamie Sleigh from the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences Waikato Clinical Campus, recognised the need for non-opioid pain relief alternatives.

Working with medicinal chemist Distinguished Professor Bill Denny at the Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, they initiated an integrated drug discovery programme to develop a new drug which retained the positive, pain relieving features of ketamine, while removing significant side effects that limited its broader clinical use.

Denny said opioid tolerance and abuse was now such a huge problem, particularly in America, an alternative was needed.

About 15 per cent of patients were now tolerant to opioids because of previous abuse, he said.
Denny and Sleigh started working on the drug in 2010 after Sleigh suggested there must be a way to use ketamine as an anaesthetic without the nasty side effects which included hallucinations.

“The problem with ketamines, adults say it’s a terrible experience and they don’t want to use it again,” Denny said.

They had now developed an analog of it which would put people to sleep but allow them to wake up as soon as the infusion was stopped, with no psychosis.

The drug had been tested on rats with success and Denny hoped they would now be able to start clinical trials in about a year.

Evelyn Body, UniServices director of commercialisation for biotechnology and board member of Kea Therapeutics, said Kea Therapeutics wanted “to transform the pain relief industry with a much-needed, non-opioid approach” and the funding would help them get to clinical testing and then on to the global pharmaceutical market.

First published-NZ Herald 13th December 2017

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Conscious Consumers raises $2m, sets sights on UK

In one of the biggest capital raises for a social enterprise in New Zealand ever, Conscious Consumers has attracted $2 million of investment for their upcoming launch into the United Kingdom. but what might it mean for the health of the industry?

Jamie Newth, from impact investment specialists Soul Capital, is a lead investor in the business, which connects ‘conscious’ consumers with ethical retailers. “It’s no surprise that this is one of the largest capital raises in history for a New Zealand social enterprise,” says Newth. “Internationally, ethical spending is on the rise, and home-grown companies like Conscious Consumers are well-placed to promote their product to a global audience. There has been a huge amount of interest from UK investors.”

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Wherewolf sets course for US after raising $550K

Adventure tourism software developer Wherewolf is gearing up for a push into the US after securing $550,000 of angel investment.

The Queenstown-based firm plans to open an office in the States on the back of the over-subscribed funding from the Flying Kiwi Angels.

Co-founder Ben Calder, who has just returned from a month-long trip to America to look at office locations and talk to potential partners, said the investment will allow the company to increase functionality as well as increase sales in the northern hemisphere.

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Wherewolf sets course for US after raising $550K

Adventure tourism software developer Wherewolf is gearing up for a push into the US after securing $550,000 of angel investment.

The Queenstown-based firm plans to open an office in the States on the back of the over-subscribed funding from the Flying Kiwi Angels.

Co-founder Ben Calder, who has just returned from a month-long trip to America to look at office locations and talk to potential partners, said the investment will allow the company to increase functionality as well as increase sales in the northern hemisphere.

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Kiwi startup developing prospective musicians through gamification

New Zealand tech startup Melodics has raised US$1.2m in seed capital to take its instrument learning software to more aspiring musicians.

The company, founded by former Serato CEO Sam Gribben, has successfully closed its latest round of investment led by Berlin-based music firm Ableton AG, with support from US accelerator 500 Startups, New Zealand investment funds Tuhua Ventures and K1W1, and Alex Rigopulos, founder of music gaming studio Harmonix.

“Our innovative approach to music learning has already helped over 100,000 finger drummers around the world,” Gribben says.

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Kiwi tech company raises millions for expansion

Kiwi technology company Feijipiao is expanding across New Zealand and eyeing other markets after closing a multi-million dollar angel investment round.

The company, founded in 2016 by Peter Li, is a Chinese language online travel business, offering flight bookings across multiple airlines in Chinese.

The website offers competitive fares and multiple payment solutions, in either Chinese yuan or New Zealand dollars, through automated search, booking, and ticketing processes.

The investment was headed by The Icehouse and Chinese-led angel fund Eden Ventures – its first investment.

Led by Chinese venture capitalists and entrepreneurs, Eden Ventures focuses on high performing start-ups, with specific interest in serving Chinese in New Zealand or enabling New Zealand founders to launch into the Chinese market.

The funding values Feijipiao at between $5 million and $10m, and would be used to hire staff, open its first New Zealand office in Auckland and fund further growth, as well as prepare the business for expansion into Australia and other markets.

The company was already bringing in revenue of about $900,000 per month, with Li saying he expected this to hit $1m in the coming few months.

Icehouse fund manager Jason Wang said both groups had invested based on Feijipiao’s growth in the five months since it launched, as well as the potential they saw for it.

“In three months, feijipiao.co.nz have transacted millions of dollars without a physical office, it’s all in the cloud.

“The results speak for themselves – this is a group of the right people doing the right thing in the right market.”

The company’s success had been helped by millennials influencing the purchasing behaviours of their parents, who tended to use more traditional travel agents Li said.

The investment would enable the company to continue its expansion as well as providing strategic value for the firm.

“Our team has built a strong foundation in New Zealand to prepare ourselves for expansion into global markets with established Chinese communities, and international students from China.

“By partnering with Eden Ventures and The Icehouse, we can tap into their expertise of forming long-term growth strategies for global expansion, and supporting technology driven companies.”

First published on nzherald.co.nz on 15 Sept 2017

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Snowball Effect – Recap of the last 3 years

AANZ member, Snowball Effect has recently released a three year update on the performance of their platform. It contains a wealth of fascinating insight and is really transparent about the money raised and the profile of their investors. It’s a timely provocation to all our members. This sort of data is critical to raising the profile, performance and reputation of early stage investment as an asset class worthy of attention.

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Over its first three years of operation, Snowball Effect has raised $29 million across 35 offers. 25 of these offers were made available publicly and 10 were made available privately. The public offers generated $23.1 million in investment and the private offers generated $6.1 million. The private offers are now the fastest growing part of the Snowball Effect marketplace.

Capital raised

The capital being raised in each offer is significant relative to the rest of the industry in NZ, with eight offers reaching over $1 million raised and the average public offer reaching $923k. This compares to a market average for public offers on other platforms of just $371k. Large public offers like Zeffer and Designer Wardrobe are attracting significant numbers of investors. The average number of investors into a public offer was 142 people and 14 offers have received investment from over 100 investors.

Investment sizes

There have been 3,935 investments made through Snowball Effect. The largest portion of the amount invested came from investments in the $10k to $50k range, with $8.9 million worth of investments from this range. The largest single investment was $1.25 million and 632 investments were over $10k. At the smaller end of the scale, the largest number of investments was in the $1k and $5k range, with 2,162 investments in this range.

Investor behaviour

The platform now has an audience of 15,509 of whom 2,413 have made an investment. So far, 27% have made more than one investment and 7.5% have made four or more investments. 17 people have invested in more than 10 offers and the most active investor has invested in 25 offers.

Investor demographics

The average age is 45, the youngest investor is 18, and the oldest investor is 88. So far, 24% of active investors on the platform are female, which compares to a national average in 2005 of 5% for angel investor networks in 2012 (according to the Angel Association of NZ).

Wholesale investors

There are 896 wholesale investors registered on the platform. Wholesale investors are eligible to receive a wider range of investment offers because of their net-worth, experience with private investments, or financial sophistication. The average investment into a private offer is $35k and there are 48 investors who have invested over $100k.

Additional services

Snowball Effect launched the first public offer using the equity crowdfunding rules in New Zealand. In company’s second year, it introduced a private offer service and added a nominee service that lets companies manage multiple investors through a single legal entity. This year it introduced an investor profile that lets investors control what types of private offers they get access to and a director matching service that helps companies find independent or non-executive directors. 80 people have completed their independent director profile. Snowball Effect has also introduced a share registry management service which is currently tracking the shareholding of 468 investors.

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2017 Angel Summit focuses on next 10 years

The tenth Annual New Zealand Angel Summit will be held at Cable Bay Winery – Waiheke Island from 1 – 3 November 2017. It’s theme; “Doubling down on success… the next ten years!”

New Zealand is now decade in to formal angel investing in New Zealand and has amassed some impressive statistics for a nation of our size. Over $500m into nearly 1000 deals in the more formal part of our market. Ten years ago there were 4 clubs and 100 or so angels. Today there are 10 clubs and over 650 angels. All this activity has delivered hundreds of jobs and tens of millions of revenue. It’s this value creation we want to continue to accelerate.

Ten years ago there were 4 clubs and 100 or so angels. Today there are 10 clubs and over 650 angels. All this activity has delivered hundreds of jobs and tens of millions of revenue. It’s this value creation we want to continue to accelerate.

The 10th Annual NZ Angel Summit is being held back where it all started at Cable Bay Winery on Waiheke Island. The choice of the small intimate venue continues the deliberate approach by the Angel Association to ensure it creates the right atmosphere for relaxed and informal conversations between active angel investors. The last two summits have sold out and it unapologetically prioritises attendance for those who are ‘doing deals’.

On the first morning the Summit will celebrate our community of investors and founders and their achievements in the past decade. There is so much to be proud of. The rest of the event will be spent digging into what we need to do to double down on our successes based on stories and insights from New Zealand’s heroes. International speakers, carefully vetted for their ability to both understand New Zealand’s unique circumstances and our aspiration for outcomes and success are flying in to present.

Showcasing Angel Investor Backed Ventures

The Showcase event which kicks off the event will include up to 10 venture in three tiers; seed, first formal round, last raise with a clear exit path. Each group of ventures will be introduced by an experienced angel investor who will talk about the investment opportunity, the return profile, valuations and potential acquirers.

New Zealand Investor Keynotes

Key Note sessions will include deep insight into what we can be proud of and what’s next. Stalwart investors will share memories of getting started – what was their vision and what inspired them, their challenges and what we need to do in the next decade to ensure value is delivered. These sessions will explore why our environment looked as it did 10 years ago, how far we’ve come and how we build on what we’ve created and set the vision for the next 10 years.

International Angel Investors

International special guests include Justin Milano (Good Startups, San Francisco, USA) who will explore the role of fear in the early-stage space. A veteran of Silicon Valley, Mr Milano has worked with angels and entrepreneurs to use cutting edge psychology and neuroscience, including emotional intelligence skills to help entrepreneurs and angels create break-throughs and unlock potential. Ron Wiessman (Band of Angels, San Francisco, US) will deliver a dose of reality exploring the critical the role of capital strategy and how tough it can be to source and entice an acquirers.

Actionable Insights

The extensive programme includes gritty content which covers; building strategic value, actively managing your portfolio for returns, Government’s role – identifying the right policy levers, the role of NZ corporate venture, and deep dives into term sheets – how have they have evolved and what role do they play in venture success lead by AANZ Expert Partner, Avid Legal’s Bruno Bordignon. Insight into which industries and technologies are going to irrevocably disrupt markets in the coming decades and make the best investment opportunities round out the valuable programme.

Finally, the event will also include the presentation of Arch Angel Award and two inaugural awards “Contribution to the industry” and “Lead angel and best venture award” – celebrating a great angel/founder collaboration.

To book your seat (preference is given to active angel investors) click here.

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Treatment of women & diversity in angel investment

Shabby, unkind and unprofessional treatment of women by men (and sometimes by other women) whether in venture capital or more broadly is unacceptable. While women have had the rough end of the stick for hundreds of years, being treated fairly and kindly should not be gender specific.

It is not about being a woman or a man or even religion or ethnicity. It’s about the values we choose to live by and which values give us a greater crack at success – however we define success!

How we treat each other and the importance of diversity is about a set of values and two values in particular – kindness and respect.

Supporting and scaling start-ups is no walk in the park. It’s often challenging and down right terrifying – for founders and investors. The fear of failure and rejection is always skulking in the shadows of fund raising, closing a sales deal and hiring senior employees. It’s anxiety inducing.

More kindness and respect would not go amiss. The AANZ believes both are key components of success, particularly when it comes to successfully scaling high growth startups.

We need to acknowledge that tough conversations are often necessary in our world. These may feel unkind but the pain can be minimised if respect and empathy – without bias – are at the heart of these conversations too.

Values complimenting kindness also support the importance of diversity. Kindness requires open-mindedness, curiosity and exploring different points of view. Successful founders live these values and these values are at the heart of the informed pivot and the ability to create and build value.

Kindness must underpin ensuring there is diversity in our deal flow, at our events and in our governance. Diversity mustn’t be about tokenism or ticking a box. Delivering diversity is about trying and looking harder to ensure it exists. It’s about valuing people to create value. We should select women (or Maori or Chinese or Buddhist) founders, speakers and board members based on their ability to shine and help others to shine. To do anything other than this is unkind – to everyone, and especially to the ‘box tickee’.

The AANZ Code of Conduct can be found here. We have added two clauses to the behaviours we expect. They are to be:
– Kind and respectful, and
– Supportive of diversity

As an industry we take responsibility, individually and collectively, for reflecting the behaviours set out in the Code of Conduct. We will talk quietly to those we are worried might not be reflecting these. We are not advocates of naming and shaming. That’s not kind or respectful.

The AANZ Constitution, however, makes it clear that our members must be “of good standing in the angel investment community” and there is provision for members to be expelled when this is no longer the case. The profound potential for common good inherent in angel investment is squandered when the self-interest reflected in unkindness is prioritised.

We all have circles of inspiration and impact – we must be the change we want to see – it’s powerful stuff.

Onwards…

Suse Reynolds
Executive Director

“Constant kindness can accomplish much. As the sun makes ice melt, kindness causes misunderstanding, mistrust, and hostility to evaporate.” – Albert Schweitzer

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Capital Markers Report: Venturing closer to maturity

Richard Dellabarca, chief executive of the NZ Venture Investment Fund, has completed a strategic review of the industry and provided growth options to Government, reports Tim McCready.
Last year, then Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce announced a review of New Zealand Venture Investment Fund’s structure, reiterating the Government’s ambition for the fund to become self-sustaining.
Soon after the announcement, Richard Dellabarca was appointed chief executive of NZVIF in mid-2016 — a move that indicated the industry was maturing.
Dellabarca, an investment banker, had spent 14 years offshore in a variety of leadership roles in venture-backed companies, capital markets, financial services and technology-related opportunities.
He brings a private sector investment perspective, but given his experience as an entrepreneur he understands what is required to build globally scalable companies.
“Really good Venture Capital funds (VCs) are looking to build businesses. Investment is an important skill to have, but their greatest skill is in building companies,” he says.
“It helps to have gone through the journey of building a global company, or a company with global aspirations, in order to understand what is needed.”
When Dellabarca joined NZVIF, he was given a blank piece of paper and the mandate to go away and undertake an independent strategic review. He has spent the last year speaking with stakeholders — around 140 organisations and 230 individuals.
Dellabarca says he is encouraged with the significant amount of investable opportunities in New Zealand, noting that founders and teams tend to be aspirational and motivated, and companies aim to be global from day one.
The review noted a growing amount of angel investment — $69 million in the last year, and more than $400 million since figures have been tracked — in addition to the significant investment into universities and Crown Research Institutes.
There is money available in New Zealand to fund proof-of-concept in early stage companies.
But a shortage of funds was identified for opportunities requiring $5-20 million in early stage growth capital.
In addition, Dellabarca noted that in the Silicon Valley or the UK, “you generally see funds syndicating with two or three investors when raising Series A & B investment.
“Yet over here, we have only Movac and Global from Day One (GD1) investing locally in growth capital, severely limiting the opportunity to syndicate investments or fully fund early stage growth companies through to maturity — and ultimately a successful realisation of the investment.”
Although eight Venture Capital funds were originally established in New Zealand, the average fund size was only NZ$45 million compared with a global average of approximately US$300 million.
Dellabarca explains there is a good reason for global fund sizes given the amount of money a company generally requires through to an investment realisation.
“They will tend to invest in, say, 15-18 companies at $5-10 million each, and then keep money aside for further follow-on investment in companies that are succeeding.
“This allows for better funds management practice, managing downside while optimising on upside opportunities,” he says.
“These historic sub-scale New Zealand funds tended to invest in a range of companies, but then either didn’t have capacity to fund them through to success and, therefore under-capitalised them, or had later stage investors dilute them down when they couldn’t follow on with the investment.
Hopefully in 15 years we won’t need a NZVIF in any guise, and instead there will be several self-sustaining funds of scale.
Richard Dellabarca
“The consequence was that many of these funds didn’t generate appropriate returns for their investors,” Dellabarca says.
While offshore corporates and financial institutions have had an interest in allocating money into New Zealand technology innovation, they have not been able to find a platform to put the money in.
As many of these institutions manage multibillion-dollar funds, the smallest investment they are willing to make is $50-$100 million.
“With an average fund size of $45 million, their mandate will often preclude them from being more than 10-20 per cent of a fund,” says Dellabarca.
“By definition you need a $300 million to $400 million fund to take these cheques.
“We just haven’t set up a fund of scale to allow foreign investors to come in and access innovation.”
NZVIF have presented a number of options to Economic Development Minister Simon Bridges that aim to make the fund self-sustainable.
Although Dellabarca is unable to divulge the details on those options, he says the fund-of-funds model with its hefty fees on fees structure is no longer viable.
The results of the strategic review provide a clue that early stage expansion capital for growth companies is New Zealand’s choke point, and is a gap NZVIF would like to address if a model that works can be established.
“There is an unmet need. You could argue about the specific number but the current deal flow suggests an annual demand of $200-$300 million,” says Dellabarca.
“If you assume our current VCs invest over five years, holding back 30 per cent for follow-on investment (the traditional venture capital investing model), then you have approximately $20-$25 million invested per year, versus a demand of up to $300 million per year.
“But whatever the number is, it is substantially larger than available capital. The aspirational goal is to have that need met in some way or another.”
Considering the future, Dellabarca says that he would like to see more money in the angel space. NZVIF is currently the second largest angel investor in New Zealand, and he hopes that in time it won’t be needed.
He has the same goal for the venture capital space.
“Hopefully in 15 years we won’t need a NZVIF in any guise, and instead there will be several self-sustaining funds of scale,” he says.
“We don’t have government intervention in private equity.
“You would hope that ultimately the same will happen in the venture capital space.”
Power of NZVIF?
• The NZ Venture Investment Fund (NZVIF) was established by the Labour Government in 2002 to build a vibrant early stage investment market in New Zealand by investing alongside private venture capital funds into high-growth companies.
NZVIF currently has $245 million of funds under management which it invests through two vehicles:
• a $195 million venture capital fund of funds, partnering with private New Zealand venture capital funds to support the development of innovative companies from start-up through to growth (investing on a two-to-one basis).
• a $50 million Seed Co-Investment Fund (SCIF) established in 2005 to encourage angel investment and fill the investment gap for entrepreneurs needing capital to get their business underway (investing on a one-to-one basis).
Since its inception, NZVIF has formed 27 investment partners (16 angel and 11 venture capital partners) and invested in a portfolio of 236 companies.
NZVIF has helped stimulate $2.2 billion in leveraged capital, $1.2 billion in attracted overseas capital, employment of 6076 FTEs and $174 million in taxes.
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NZ tech sector attracts record offshore investment

New Zealand’s technology sector saw record growth in funding, driven by overseas investors in the year to March, according to the second annual Investors’ Guide to the New Zealand Technology Sector.
“The tech sector is New Zealand’s third largest exporting sector, contributing $16 billion to GDP (gross domestic product) and it is growing fast,” Economic Development Minister Simon Bridges said in a statement. “It presents multiple opportunities for New Zealand and international investors.”

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Opinion: The state of play for New Zealand’s venture capital industry

The question of the future of the NZ Venture Investment Fund is the trigger for one of the most important questions right now in New Zealand – how early stage venture capital in R&D, innovation and technology is funded and managed.
It goes beyond the question of NZVIF, which is a legacy institution and served a different purpose in the past. NZVIF is, in effect two institutions – an investor of the $50 million Seed Coinvestment Fund co-investing alongside angel investors to date in over 230 seed and VC stage companies and manager of 11 secondary stakes in established funds. It has a team of just five investment managers, which is small relative to the number of investments. Profit maximisation of these holdings for the government by the existing team is possible with many different options.

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CropLogic prepares for ASX listing

CropLogic, a Christchurch-based developer of technology, allows farmers to more accurately control inputs such as fertiliser and water by modelling plant growth by gathering field data and making crop prescriptions and management recommendations. The company has already raised just over $1 million including $512,000 via crowdfunding platform Equitise, plans to raise AUD$3 million in an initial public offering and list on the ASX.

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More money for entrepreneurial women

A government-backed investment fund has gone into partnership with ArcAngels, a group of private individuals focused on investing in female-led business start-ups.
The New Zealand Venture Investment Fund (NZVIF) will invest dollar for dollar alongside ArcAngels through its Seed Co-Investment Fund (SCIF).
ArcAngels chairwoman Cecilia Tarrant, a director of Fletcher Building and former Morgan Stanley managing director, said it approached NZVIF to form the partnership on the back of other relationships the fund already had with angel networks around the country.
Tarrant said the deal means it would have access to more capital than the size of its membership suggested.
“That makes us more attractive for entrepreneurs.”
ArcAngels was launched in 2014 and has around 30 members although Tarrant said it hoped that would grow to around 40 by mid-year.
So far it has invested $1.6 million in eight transactions including into Pictor, Fuel 50, Acuite and Engender.
Tarrant said with the NZVIF partnership it would hope to increase its investments to around 10 per year both through new companies and follow-up investments.
NZVIF investment director Bridget Unsworth said the ArcAngel partnership was the 17th it had entered into through its SCIF.
To date NZVIF and its angel partners had co-invested around $142m into more than 150 companies.
Unsworth said the ArcAngel partnership would double the capital available to companies.
“The past year has seen continued healthy investment activity across New Zealand with more than $60 million invested by angel funds and groups.
“There is a healthy level of syndication of investments among different angel groups meaning they are likely to invest in opportunities throughout New Zealand. Early stage investing is a high-risk investment class and so diversification is important.”
Tarrant said around one-third of start-up companies in New Zealand were led by women or had a major female component but the number of female-led companies which attracted investment was lower.
At the same time the number of women angel investors was also lower.
Tarrant said the group hoped to replicate the success of the New York-based, women-led angel group, Golden Seeds, which has invested more than US$80m ($114m) in more than 76 women-led companies.
“Our principal aim is to make successful investments. But we also want to empower more women entrepreneurs, strengthen their competitiveness and maximise the success of New Zealand’s small business engine for greater economic growth in the long term.
“Many of our members are experienced angel investors with the capacity and capability to be able to provide mentoring and ongoing support to the female-led ventures the group invests into.”
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NZ Angel Values and Expectations

People do business with people. This is a universal truth, but in angel and early stage investment, the people side is writ large.

Angels and founders share a hunger for success and making a difference. It is this trait that aligns us so tightly.

There are a number of other values that underpin an angel investor’s effectiveness. A year or two back it seemed a good idea to explicitly set out these values and how we expect each other to behave, so the Angel Association agreed a Code of Conduct.

It sets out the following values as being important to us:

  • To be passionately ambitious for our ventures,
  • To be collaborative and collegial, and
  • To act with integrity and honesty.

Growing a successful business is hard work. Without passion and ambition, the knock-backs and grind of growing a business would quickly overwhelm most us. Angels share other traits with founders that are critical to success; unremitting optimism and creativity. The ability to positively and constructively address problems is powerful stuff.

Growing a successful business is never done alone. Generosity of spirit is one of the most inspirational aspects of working in angel investment. Angels bring value which goes way beyond their ability to write a cheque. Our experience, networks and expertise are the real rocket fuel. And what’s more, when a founder receives money from an investor in the formal NZ angel community, that investor is bringing over 600 people who share a generosity of spirit and values of collaboration and collegiality.

Another key component of success in the angel world is honesty and integrity. We have made it clear that communicating quickly and clearly is vital. We put great store on ‘doing what you say you are going to do’. When we commit to invest or offer to make an introduction, you should expect we will do it. If we are required to sign a document, you should expect it to be done quickly. Of course this isn’t always possible. We all know “life” happens, but you should expect that if something does get in the way of our doing what we said we would, we will communicate.

We also expect professionalism. Dealing professionally with each other sets the standard we expect of ourselves and our ventures as they grow into world-beating enterprises. Time and energy can be scarce resources in this setting. Sometimes this makes it challenging to operate at the levels of professionalism we are used to in other parts of our lives, but we strive for it nevertheless. Angel investors are also by definition actively involved in the business and with the founder. This level of familiarity also requires us to be sensitive to the need for professionalism.

These principles serve as the foundation for our dealings with each other and are the standards others working with us, such as founders and professional service providers, should expect.

What does this look like in practice?

If you are seeking angel investment should know that our members are looking for a credible entrepreneur with aspirations to grow an internationally competitive business with a well-defined product, customer and market. You should expect professional, prompt, objective and constructive guidance from our members, whether or not you ultimately secure capital.

Ends

Suze Reynolds

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I Slept With 65 VCs and Learned These Things

Our first suitor called us in the spring. They offered to pay for coffee. It was our first date. I had butterflies in my stomach. They promised they’d done this before and that I shouldn’t be nervous.

I could tell they were experienced. Their smile was soothing.

They looked me in the eyes. They wanted our pitch deck. “Do you use protection?” I asked. “No.” I knew it was dangerous doing it without protection. But it was so tempting. I was excited. I wanted to get in their portfolio. I couldn’t resist. So I took a deep breath and slipped the deck in. “Is it in yet?” I felt naked. I didn’t care. Maybe this was the one, I thought. Maybe they’ll actually call me back after this meeting. Maybe they’ll invest.

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Unicorn Investors: The Top 5 Firms With the Best Record

Unicorn. Few words are as celebrated in the tech world — and few, as hated.

Coined in 2013 by Aileen Lee to describe a private company valued at over $1 billion, unicorn — much like its relatives “growth hacking,” “deep dive” and “making the world a better place” — began with the best of intentions …only to wind up where roads paved that way tend to go.

While no one can deny the unicorn’s past supremacy, a growing minority has begun hailing its “extinction,” and in its place, the rise of the “cockroach.” Dropping IPOs, rumors of tech’s next “burst,” and, of course, good old-fashioned hype all threaten the unicorn’s existence.

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Lead Partners

NZTE NZVIF PWC

Expert Partner

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AANZ Summit Sponsors

Callaghan Innovation “UniServices” Kiwinet “Spark”