Angel investment rises 26% to reach record level

Startups in New Zealand received an unprecedented level of funding last year, with $86 million flowing into early-stage businesses across the country. That’s according to Startup Investment NZ, published by PwC New Zealand, the Angel Association of New Zealand (AANZ) and the New Zealand Venture Investment Fund (NZVIF).

“It’s exciting to see such a large number of deals coming through to support early-stage companies. We’re seeing investment levels that are almost three times what we saw just five years ago” said Anand Reddy, Partner at PwC New Zealand.

John O’Hara, AANZ Chair, endorsed this sentiment noting that membership of angel networks continues to grow with a new network established in Marlborough last year and a budding network getting started in the Hawkes Bay.

Established networks like Ice Angels in Auckland, AngelHQ in Wellington and Enterprise Angels in Tauranga are also experiencing growing memberships.

Driving the growth in investment dollars is an increasing number of larger deals in 2017, compared to the year before. The number of deals in 2017 held steady at 111 – one lower than the 12 months previous – the total amount invested has risen by $18 million, a 26% increase.

Offering some insight on the larger number of dollars being invested in a similar number of deals, John O’Hara suggested it reflected a maturing ecosystem.

“A number of the ventures angels have backed are now looking for larger capital injections to fuel their growth. With a thin VC industry, it’s not surprising we are seeing larger deal sizes.

John also offered a word of caution to investors and founders.

“The market’s a little frothy right now. We’re seeing some strong valuations. Entrepreneurs have to be sure they’re not setting the bar too high with their forecast results. If they fail to meet these, it’ll make it make it harder for them to get the next round of funding.

“And investors will be similarly impacted. Flat and down rounds do not impact well on portfolio return prospects.”

Click here to find out more about how the startup sector is evolving, and where it’s heading next.

Click here to dive into the data about this asset class.

Please follow and like us:

The network effect: NZ angel networks drive funding

Of the $86 million invested into young companies in 2017, over half ($49 million) came from angel investment networks, rather than individual funds or institutional investment.

“The strength of our angel investment networks in New Zealand is growing every day, which helps to explain why they’re responsible for a growing share of overall funding” says AANZ Chair John O’Hara.

“They’re responsible for over double the funding that’s coming through the next most-popular channel of angel funds.”

Raising funds from angel networks can take a little longer than other sources of early stage funding (such as mico-VCs and high networth individuals) given that sometimes over a dozen individual investors are collaborating to complete DD and gather the investment. Angel networks also tend to be run with a large component of voluntary input so founders and lead investors need to be committed project managers.

John notes that not only do networks tend to bring a larger pool of connections and expertise than single source funding options, they bring deeper reserves of connections for follow on funding.

“Angels are inveterate travellers and networkers and have connections in markets across the world which can be tapped for sales channels, in-market insights as well as follow on funding recommendations,” said John.

“Nothing beats getting on a plane with a line-up of carefully targeted meetings. New Zealand founders and investor directors need to spend more time in-market and be preparing for the founder to be based there,” John added.

He concluded by noting that lining up an in-market Board member was also an important component of scaling into offshore markets.

Click here to find out more about how the startup sector is evolving, and where it’s heading next.

Click here to dive into the data about this asset class.

Please follow and like us:

Software the top sector for NZ angel investors

More than half the investment made in early stage companies in New Zealand last year was in the software and services space (53.8%), followed by 17% in technology hardware and equipment.

“Technology is increasingly the engine of growth for all companies, regardless of size” explains PWC’s Anand Reddy.

“It’s no surprise that it’s these areas where the most activity is happening and where angel and early-stage investors are putting their energy. This reflects global trends too. Data generated by Crunchbase notes that the software and services remains the dominant sector for investment.”

Speaking personally, John O’Hara said that his own portfolio leant towards software generated ventures.

“I am particularly proud of Ask Nicely, which produces software for NPS (net promoter score) collection and analysis. This company has already generated tangible returns for a number of the early angel investors. The company is now scaling into the US, with the founder moving to Portland, Oregon in the last couple of months.

“New Zealanders have a knack for practical problem solution and we are increasingly seeing them turn this knack into compelling business opportunities,” said O’Hara.

Click here to find out more about how the startup sector is evolving, and where it’s heading next.

Click here to dive into the data about this asset class.

Please follow and like us:

Debra Hall named New Zealand Arch Angel 2017

One of New Zealand’s most ardent angel investors, Debra Hall, has been awarded the Angel Association of New Zealand’s (AANZ) prestigious Arch Angel Award at the 10th Anniversary NZ Angel Summit on Waiheke Island.

The Arch Angel Award is the highest honour in New Zealand’s angel investment community, and recognises individuals who reflect the qualities of the best angel investors and who are champions for the endeavour.

The award recognises the significant amount of time and money angels contribute to startups and early-stage companies – and specifically to their founders and teams – to help them reach their potential while also recognising angels who make a significant difference to New Zealand’s startup ecosystem

Debra has made many investments in early-stage companies and been an investor director for a number of these ventures. She has held governance roles with Auckland-based IceAngels, the Angel Association itself and is currently an Advisory Board member for the first Chinese founded angel investment group, Zino Ventures. In 2015 Debra received IceAngels “William H Payne, Active Angel Award”.

AANZ Chair and 2015 Arch Angel recipient, Marcel van den Assum, says Debra imbues all the qualities of a top-notch angel.

“She is not only an active investor, contributing money and the deep expertise she has from scaling and selling her own market research company, but Debra also genuinely cares about the founders she backs, providing personal and practical advice which is a vital part of the more holistic role angel investors play,” he said.

Marcel, who worked with Debra during her time on the AANZ Council, said her contribution to the angel investment in New Zealand is marked.

“The passion and energy she brings is extraordinary, whether it’s developing and delivering a specialised course for aspiring directors of angel-backed companies, or on the boards of companies she’s backed, advising entrepreneurs, making deals happen by bringing people together or cajoling and gathering data on our community, Debra has made a very real impact and lifted the professionalism, profile and reputation of angel investment in New Zealand.”

Andy Hamilton, recipient of the 2011 award, has known Debra since she began angel investing in 2007 and said she had been a dedicated and invaluable member of IceAngels, renowned not just for her deal making capability but also for the lively dinners she and her husband Peter have hosted over the years for dozens of international visitors.

Interviewed in Startup Young Company Finance Report’s October 2016 edition, Debra noted that she and Peter had heard about IceAngels through a connection who knew Andy Hamilton and subsequently received an introduction to the group.

“In those days, from the outside, it looked to me like a secret society,” Debra said. She subsequently discovered that wasn’t the case – “all angels are very welcoming of new members and in fact eager to get new angels on board,” she said.

“Peter and I invest together and we only invest in companies we both agree on. We’ve taken small and big investments across a diverse range of companies – from technical manufacturing, to biotech, to software businesses.”

It was in this article that Debra set out why she is so passionate about the role good governance plays in the success of angel-backed companies.

“Governance is often seen as an inconvenience or intrusion by founders, however an effective board is actually critical to their success. With many of these companies, we’re dealing with a team that has never run a business before, so experienced directors are not just bringing classic governance to the table, they’re bringing their contacts, business experience and willingness to take on risks – often for minimal remuneration,” Debra pointed out.

Debra received her award at the 10th Anniversary NZ Angel Summit, held at Cable Bay Winery on Waiheke Island and attended by 150 delegates. The annual event provides a hub for angels to learn and network, and is recognised as one of the world’s top angel events.

South African born, Debra was that country’s first female metallurgical engineer. After immigrating to New Zealand, her career changed tack when she took on a job for a market research company that allowed her to work from home. She found a passion for the sector, leading her to establish the market research company Research Solutions in 1992. It grew into one of the country’s leading market research consultancies, and was sold to global market research giant, Synovate in 2007. She chaired the New Zealand Marketing Association for a number of years.

Former Arch Angel winners also include The Warehouse founder and long-time angel investor Stephen Tindall; Andy Hamilton, chief executive of The Icehouse and member of IceAngels; US super angel Bill Payne; veteran angel investor Dr Ray Thomson; prolific AngelHQ member, Trevor Dickinson and current AANZ Chair, Marcel van den Assum.

–Ends–

For more information, please contact:

Suse Reynolds, AANZ executive director
mob: 021 490 974 or email: [email protected]

 

Marcel van den Assum, AANZ chair and 2015 Arch Angel
mob: 021 963 459 or email: [email protected]

 

The Angel Association of New Zealand (AANZ)
The Angel Association is an organisation that aims to increase the quantity, quality and success of angel investments in New Zealand and in doing so create a greater pool of capital for innovative start-up companies. It was established in 2008 to bring together New Zealand angels and early-stage funds. AANZ currently has 30 members representing over 700 individual angels associated with New Zealand’s key angel networks and funds. Recent NZVIF data revealed angels have invested more than $NZ484m in over 928 deals and 296 companies in the last 10 years. AANZ works closely with NZTE and Callaghan Innovation and a number of private sector partners including NZX, First NZ Capital, PWC, Avid Legal, AJ Park, KiwiNet, Uniservices and Spark Ventures. For more, please visit: www.angelassociation.co.nz

 

Please follow and like us:

Treatment of women & diversity in angel investment

Shabby, unkind and unprofessional treatment of women by men (and sometimes by other women) whether in venture capital or more broadly is unacceptable. While women have had the rough end of the stick for hundreds of years, being treated fairly and kindly should not be gender specific.

It is not about being a woman or a man or even religion or ethnicity. It’s about the values we choose to live by and which values give us a greater crack at success – however we define success!

How we treat each other and the importance of diversity is about a set of values and two values in particular – kindness and respect.

Supporting and scaling start-ups is no walk in the park. It’s often challenging and down right terrifying – for founders and investors. The fear of failure and rejection is always skulking in the shadows of fund raising, closing a sales deal and hiring senior employees. It’s anxiety inducing.

More kindness and respect would not go amiss. The AANZ believes both are key components of success, particularly when it comes to successfully scaling high growth startups.

We need to acknowledge that tough conversations are often necessary in our world. These may feel unkind but the pain can be minimised if respect and empathy – without bias – are at the heart of these conversations too.

Values complimenting kindness also support the importance of diversity. Kindness requires open-mindedness, curiosity and exploring different points of view. Successful founders live these values and these values are at the heart of the informed pivot and the ability to create and build value.

Kindness must underpin ensuring there is diversity in our deal flow, at our events and in our governance. Diversity mustn’t be about tokenism or ticking a box. Delivering diversity is about trying and looking harder to ensure it exists. It’s about valuing people to create value. We should select women (or Maori or Chinese or Buddhist) founders, speakers and board members based on their ability to shine and help others to shine. To do anything other than this is unkind – to everyone, and especially to the ‘box tickee’.

The AANZ Code of Conduct can be found here. We have added two clauses to the behaviours we expect. They are to be:
– Kind and respectful, and
– Supportive of diversity

As an industry we take responsibility, individually and collectively, for reflecting the behaviours set out in the Code of Conduct. We will talk quietly to those we are worried might not be reflecting these. We are not advocates of naming and shaming. That’s not kind or respectful.

The AANZ Constitution, however, makes it clear that our members must be “of good standing in the angel investment community” and there is provision for members to be expelled when this is no longer the case. The profound potential for common good inherent in angel investment is squandered when the self-interest reflected in unkindness is prioritised.

We all have circles of inspiration and impact – we must be the change we want to see – it’s powerful stuff.

Onwards…

Suse Reynolds
Executive Director

“Constant kindness can accomplish much. As the sun makes ice melt, kindness causes misunderstanding, mistrust, and hostility to evaporate.” – Albert Schweitzer

Please follow and like us:

Kiwi startup Hydroxsys technologies could help clean up NZ’s waterways

Hydroxsys is a clean-tech company founded on unique water extraction technologies aimed at mining, dairy and other industries requiring water extraction or remediation.

The company has acquired an experienced management team focused on developing the company’s IP and bringing revolutionary products to market.

NZ food network has thrown in their lot with Hydroxsys and is helping the company develop their revolutionary technologies.

Read more

Please follow and like us:

Investor Activity in NZ Tech Sector Continues to Intensify

TIN100 and MBIE launch second annual “Investor’s Guide to the New Zealand Technology Sector”
Auckland, May 9, 2017 – Investment in New Zealand’s technology companies continues to rise, with record amounts of funding coming from offshore investors, according to the second annual Investor’s Guide to the New Zealand Technology Sector published jointly by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) and the Technology Investment Network (TIN).

Read more

Please follow and like us:

Global Survey Rates NZ Start-up Ecosystem

New Zealand start-ups have the highest percentage of offshore customers when measured against their counterparts from 50 other ecosystems including New York, Moscow, Beijing and London.

For the first time over 100 kiwi start-ups have taken part in the Compass Start-up Genome’s Ecosystem Ranking Survey. The Compass Start-up Genome project team is based in San Francisco and benchmarks start-up ecosystems from around the world.

The 2016 survey results have just been released at the Global Entrepreneurship Congress in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Commenting on New Zealand’s performance AANZ Chair, Marcel van den Assum said he was pleased to see “NZ Inc” on the world map.

“Start-up eco-system inputs such as volume of deals, number of angel investors and investment levels have grown consistently, and position New Zealand as a highly credible performer on a per capita basis,” said Mr van den Assum.

“I am particularly pleased to see our founders and start-ups leading the charge when it comes to engaging globally. To generate the level of value we hope our start-ups will deliver for New Zealand and their shareholders, we have to think and sell globally from day one. And our companies obviously are.”

New Zealand start-ups also ranked among the highest, at 5th, when it comes to positively interacting with corporates.

“The extent to which our companies are garnering interest from corporates bodes well for their success. New businesses need customers and investment and corporates are a great source of both,” said van den Assum.

Another important insight revealed by the survey is New Zealand entrepreneurs’ lack of experience. Less than half of our start-up growth teams have had more than two years previous entrepreneurial experience.

While this concerning, Mr van den Assum said this finding should provide a high degree of confidence to those supporting the growth and professional development of founders and start-ups.

“The challenge for New Zealand is to apply higher levels of capability, capital and connections to those businesses that have real potential to scale and deliver a return on investment to all eco-system participants. This is fundamental to longer-term sustainability. Those running start-up weekends, government incubation and accelerator programmes and the Seed Co-Investment Fund now have a clear evidence that these programmes are vital and much needed,” he said.

The survey was led by the Angel Association NZ and carried out with support from NZX, New Zealand Trade and Enterprise, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund, Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment and Callaghan Innovation.

“Lifting and supporting our high growth tech companies requires a NZ Inc approach so we are pleased that acquiring this data reflected that,” said Mr van den Assum.

 

For more information, please contact:

Suse Reynolds, AANZ executive director
mob: 021 490 974 or email: [email protected]

Marcel van den Assum, AANZ chair and 2015 Arch Angel
mob: 021 963 459 or email: [email protected]

The Angel Association of New Zealand (AANZ)

The Angel Association is an organisation that aims to increase the quantity, quality and success of angel investments in New Zealand and in doing so create a greater pool of capital for innovative start-up companies. It was established in 2008 to bring together New Zealand angels and early-stage funds. AANZ currently has 27 members representing over 600 individual angels associated with New Zealand’s key angel networks and funds. Recent NZ Venture Investment Fund data revealed angels have invested more than $NZ437m in over 928 deals and 296 companies in the last 10 years. For more, please visit: www.angelassociation.co.nz

The Compass Start-up Genome

The Global Startup Ecosystem Ranking is the definitive resource for founders, investors and other leaders to understand entrepreneurial vibrancy in 50+ leading cities. It was been published at the Global Entrepreneurship Congress 2017 in Johannesburg, South Africa last week in front of policymakers from 160+ countries. It will be read by approximately 500,000 people (25% founders, 25% investors, 25% policy makers, 25% other). A full copy of the report can be found at  https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/52927-startup-ecosystem-report-2017?locale=en

New Zealand Venture Investment Fund

The New Zealand Venture Investment Fund invests with venture capital funds and alongside angel investors to support New Zealand technology companies with start-up and growth capital. The NZVIF was established by the New Zealand government in 2002 to build a vibrant early stage investment market in New Zealand. We have $300 million of funds under management which are invested through two vehicles: the $250 million Venture Capital Fund of funds and the $50 million Seed Co-investment Fund. All our investments are made either through privately managed venture capital funds, or alongside experienced angel investors, who we partner with to invest into New Zealand-originated, high-growth potential companies.

Callaghan Innovation

Callaghan Innovation is the government’s business innovation agency. Its purpose is to grow New Zealand’s economy by helping businesses succeed through technology. It delivers innovation services to businesses and build New Zealand’s innovation capability, including supporting a network of incubators and accelerators across New Zealand. It also provides technical and scientific expertise, impartial advice, skills development, access to industry networks, and grant funding. www.callaghaninnovation.govt.nz

 

 

Please follow and like us:

Tech innovators pitch their wares at agribusiness showcase

Agritech innovators bathed in the spotlight at the latest Agribusiness Showcase near Palmerston North as they pitched their wares to investors looking for the next best and most profitable thing.

The occasion marked the fourth year of the showcase, sponsored by New Zealand Trade and Enterprise and the ASB, this year with a focus on 12 companies working on environmental and precision technologies.

“These companies show tenacity and courage, it’s been quite inspirational to work with them,” said NZTE investment leader Quentin Quin.

Read more

Please follow and like us:

Bay of Plenty investors take control of Rockit apple company

An argument over the ownership of the high-profile company responsible for producing the miniature Rockit apples has been resolved, with Bay of Plenty-based Oriens Capital and Auckland’s Pioneer Capital buying out company founder Phil Alison.
The Havelock North Fruit Company had been producing the apples, which are marketed in plastic tubes as a high quality snack food in New Zealand and internationally.
Mr Alison, who controlled a 49.5 per cent share of the company, originally wanted to buy out the remaining shareholders, which included a number of prominent Bay of Plenty investors. The disagreement went to the High Court last year after the parties failed to agree on price.
However, the company announced yesterday that an agreement had been reached by the shareholders under which the two experienced private equity companies would acquire all of Mr Alison’s shareholding. The transaction was also significant in being the first investment by Oriens Capital, the regions-focused Tauranga private equity firm launched last year.
Mr Alison has sold all his Rockit-related interests and would no longer be involved with the company, its subsidiaries, or related orchard suppliers of fruit.
Effective immediately, the company would begin trading as Rockit Global Ltd. Acting chief executive Austin Mortimer has been appointed chief executive of Rockit Global.
Chairman John Loughlin said the value of the transaction remained confidential.
Rockit snacks were now grown in seven countries and sold through partners in 22 countries, he said. In 2016, the company exported 77 containers of fruit and earned its maiden profit.
“With only 3 per cent of Rockit apple snacks sold in New Zealand, our sales and marketing focus is on key international markets,” Mr Loughlin said.
“We have strong growth plans for 2017 and the years ahead. The new shareholders have experience in growing New Zealand export businesses. They will contribute governance expertise and additional capital to help the company deliver on its ambitious growth plans.”
The Rockit Global board will include four members of the previous board – Mr Loughlin, plus well-known Tauranga investors Murray Denyer, Steve Saunders and Neil Craig. They would be joined by Oriens Capital chief executive James Beale and Pioneer Capital investment director Craig Styris.
Mr Loughlin said Mr Alison had made a huge contribution in recognising the potential of the fruit, then establishing and leading the business toward building the Rockit global brand.
“We will always be greatly appreciative of the work he put in to creating the international platform for the business,” he said.
Mr Denyer, a partner with Cooney Lees Morgan, Steve Saunders, founder of the Plus Group, and Neil Craig, founder of Craigs Investment Partners, are all Tauranga members of the Bay of Plenty’s Enterprise Angels start-up funding group.
“This is a major milestone for us,” said Mr Denyer.
“Bringing Pioneer and Oriens Capital into the business strengthens our share register enormously, and gives us access to their business expertise and experience,” he said.
“It’s also a success story for Enterprise Angels. Steve, Neil, John McDonald and myself all invested into this business back in 2011 when the founder first sought to raise capital. We’ve worked very hard to get the business to where it is today – to a point where it has gained the attention of and attracted investment from private equity players. It has graduated out of the angel investment space – something that few start-ups ever manage.”
Mr Mortimer described Rockit as significant New Zealand success story.
“It clearly demonstrates how high-quality fruit can be positioned as a premium, value-added product through a robust brand strategy. Rockit Global is now well-positioned to continue its rapid growth and capitalise on the substantial grab and go, healthy snack market.”
Rockit Global
– Rockit are miniature apples (1.5 x the size of a golf ball) with a sweet flavour, thin skin, and distinctive bright red blush.
– North Havelock Fruit Company worked with Plant & Food Research, together with Hawke’s Bay company Prevar, to develop the apple.
– Rockit Global now has the exclusive international licence to grow and market the PremA96 apple variety.
Please follow and like us:

Lead Partners

NZTE NZVIF PWC

Expert Partner

NZX AVID AJ Park “FNZC.jpg”

AANZ Summit Sponsors

Callaghan Innovation “UniServices” Kiwinet “Spark”