International angel experts descend on Summit #AANZ2018

The big event in the calendar for the Angel Association New Zealand is the annual Angel Summit.

This year our Summit focuses on the power of diversity and how it delivers better outcomes.

The world has changed significantly since we began over ten years ago. This year we acknowledge the changes and discuss how we can adapt, focusing on amping up the power of angel investment through diversity and inclusion to deliver higher value outcomes. We will be welcoming aligned VCs from NZ, Australia and Singapore to join the conversation and discuss questions like;

Why and how does a more feminine approach, both as founders and investors, add value?
What values do different ethnicities bring to angel backed ventures to increase the prospect of success?
Why is it important we include millennials in our ventures?

Joining our discussion will be;

Randy Komisar
Last year Randy Komisar, managing partner from Kleiner Perkins attended the summit with support from NZTE and Spark Ventures. Randy’s fireside chat at the end of the summit was one of the top rated presentations. As a direct result of his visit Randy was inspired to write “Straight Talk for Startups – 100 rules for beating the odds”. The book is currently ranked no.1 on Kindle’s Business Technology section. His return to NZ is intended to amplify the connections he made last year and he will play a lead role in The Runway event for founders and investor directors and spend a couple of days in Wellington.

Jeffrey Paine
Jeffrey Paine is a founding partner of Golden Gate Ventures based in Singapore. Since it’s inception in 2011 Golden Gate have invested in 30 companies across Asia. GoldenGate consider any ventures expanding into Asia and will invest between $US1-10m in early stage and series A rounds.

Wendee Wolfson
Wendee Wolfson co-founded one of the first angel networks in Washington DC, New Vantage Group with ACA Chair Emeritus, John May. She has chaired the US Angel Capital Association international exchange for the last seven years. Wendee is currently working with the Next Wave Impact Fund and has worked with the predecessor fund, Rising Tide, to educate and engage more women in early stage investment and will spend time in Auckland during her visit.

Marisa Warren
Marisa Warren is from Elevacao which has gained profile and traction in Australia, San Francisco and New York helping woman founders to scale and attract investment. Marisa has deep experience in corporate M&A and extensive networks.

Dr Sean Simpson
Dr Sean Simpson is one of the co-founders and current Chief Science Officer for Lanzatech which is ‘revolutionising the way the world thinks about carbon waste’. Sean has a tremendous depth of experience and belief in New Zealanders’ ability to change the world and will talk about lessons learned along the way as he led a team taking Lanzatech to the world. Dr. Simpson served as Leader of the Biofuels initiative at AgriGenesis BioSciences Ltd.

John Henderson
John is a Partner, Head of Venture and Business Development from Airtree Ventures based in Sydney. Airtree has made over 50 investments, including a number of NZ companies and had over a dozen exits.

We will also be privy to valuable input from a wealth of local early-stage investment experts including; the experience and insight of Marcel van den Assum, former Chair of the Angel Association and currently chairing a number of high growth ventures such as Wipster and Merlot Aero; the marketing chops of Vic Crone, CEO of Callaghan Innovation; the investment strategy of Richard Dellabarca, CEO of NZ Venture Investment Fund; and insights about fast track of growth from Janine Manning, Chair of Crimson Consulting, one of New Zealand’s most highly valued angel backed ventures.

This 11th annual Angel Summit will deliver a unique opportunity to learn how to invest to create a bright future for New Zealand, its talented entrepreneurs and drive returns so we can re-invest.

What will I come away from the summit with?
Friends and super relevant contacts, pithy, practical insights on how to be an angel with more impact, a great little goodie bag, and as is customary when you descend from a summit… arms full of inspiration!!

Check out the draft programme here.

Please follow and like us:

Into the dragon’s den with New Zealand’s million-dollar investments

Hundreds of New Zealand’s wealthiest investors gathered for the 2018 Flux Demo Day last week for a night of wining, dining, and million-dollar business investments. Jihee Junn went along to watch this year’s plucky startups pitch it out.

“The first rule of investing is: don’t leave the table when the food’s being served!” a jolly looking man at my table exclaimed. We were halfway through the night’s events when platters of braised beef, roast potatoes and Akaroa salmon were brought out to the room’s 400 or so investors. As we dug into our family-style meals, passing along giant plates of food from left to right, I asked some of my fellow diners – all older, wealthier, and a lot more male than me – for their thoughts on the startups that had pitched so far. On the whole, their responses were akin to a placid shrug.

“They were okay,” said one man, who told me his day job was working at a private investment firm. Those sitting next to him nodded in agreement. “I’m not really here to invest tonight, but if I was, there probably hasn’t been anything yet to make me want to get out my wallet.”

Read more

Please follow and like us:

Ten Companies selected for Zino New Kiwis Startup Challenge

Debra Hall, an experienced angel investor and Chairman of Zino Innovation Hub, which runs the Challenge, says the Zino team was delighted at the level of interest shown, with 42 companies, and entrepreneurs from 16 countries, entering the competition.

“As investors in start-up companies, we regularly see talent being wasted because new migrants simply don’t have the connections, the access to capital and sometimes even the language to navigate the early stage of growing a business. Zino is committed to changing this, to create new value for New Zealand” said Hall.

Read more

Please follow and like us:

Why you SHOULD be an angel investor… it’s all about portfolio management

Australian early stage angel investors often treat start-up investing like horse racing. They punt with money they’re willing to lose, but this approach has led to a lack of discipline and very poor returns.

They place a few bets based on a good jockey (founder), their form (prior success), the stable (team and advisers), horse (business), equipment (technology), running line (strategy) and weather conditions (market), but start-ups should not be treated as an adrenaline-shot gamble where the majority of investors lose their money and a few “lucky” punters make a killing.

Read more

Please follow and like us:

Garage to Global

PART 5. TAKING INVESTORS ALONG ON THE JOURNEY

Building a business is a journey, along which there will be all sorts of challenges, setbacks, break-throughs, victories and adventures. We, of course, all hope and plan for more good things to happen than bad things along the way – but regardless, it is always a journey and always an adventure.

Investors in your business are key stakeholders who not only deserve to be included in the journey for their financial support of your business but are also people who have a vested interest in helping you in the various ways they may be able to.

Read more

Please follow and like us:

Angel investment rises 26% to reach record level

Startups in New Zealand received an unprecedented level of funding last year, with $86 million flowing into early-stage businesses across the country. That’s according to Startup Investment NZ, published by PwC New Zealand, the Angel Association of New Zealand (AANZ) and the New Zealand Venture Investment Fund (NZVIF).

“It’s exciting to see such a large number of deals coming through to support early-stage companies. We’re seeing investment levels that are almost three times what we saw just five years ago” said Anand Reddy, Partner at PwC New Zealand.

John O’Hara, AANZ Chair, endorsed this sentiment noting that membership of angel networks continues to grow with a new network established in Marlborough last year and a budding network getting started in the Hawkes Bay.

Established networks like Ice Angels in Auckland, AngelHQ in Wellington and Enterprise Angels in Tauranga are also experiencing growing memberships.

Driving the growth in investment dollars is an increasing number of larger deals in 2017, compared to the year before. The number of deals in 2017 held steady at 111 – one lower than the 12 months previous – the total amount invested has risen by $18 million, a 26% increase.

Offering some insight on the larger number of dollars being invested in a similar number of deals, John O’Hara suggested it reflected a maturing ecosystem.

“A number of the ventures angels have backed are now looking for larger capital injections to fuel their growth. With a thin VC industry, it’s not surprising we are seeing larger deal sizes.

John also offered a word of caution to investors and founders.

“The market’s a little frothy right now. We’re seeing some strong valuations. Entrepreneurs have to be sure they’re not setting the bar too high with their forecast results. If they fail to meet these, it’ll make it make it harder for them to get the next round of funding.

“And investors will be similarly impacted. Flat and down rounds do not impact well on portfolio return prospects.”

Click here to find out more about how the startup sector is evolving, and where it’s heading next.

Click here to dive into the data about this asset class.

Please follow and like us:

The network effect: NZ angel networks drive funding

Of the $86 million invested into young companies in 2017, over half ($49 million) came from angel investment networks, rather than individual funds or institutional investment.

“The strength of our angel investment networks in New Zealand is growing every day, which helps to explain why they’re responsible for a growing share of overall funding” says AANZ Chair John O’Hara.

“They’re responsible for over double the funding that’s coming through the next most-popular channel of angel funds.”

Raising funds from angel networks can take a little longer than other sources of early stage funding (such as mico-VCs and high networth individuals) given that sometimes over a dozen individual investors are collaborating to complete DD and gather the investment. Angel networks also tend to be run with a large component of voluntary input so founders and lead investors need to be committed project managers.

John notes that not only do networks tend to bring a larger pool of connections and expertise than single source funding options, they bring deeper reserves of connections for follow on funding.

“Angels are inveterate travellers and networkers and have connections in markets across the world which can be tapped for sales channels, in-market insights as well as follow on funding recommendations,” said John.

“Nothing beats getting on a plane with a line-up of carefully targeted meetings. New Zealand founders and investor directors need to spend more time in-market and be preparing for the founder to be based there,” John added.

He concluded by noting that lining up an in-market Board member was also an important component of scaling into offshore markets.

Click here to find out more about how the startup sector is evolving, and where it’s heading next.

Click here to dive into the data about this asset class.

Please follow and like us:

Software the top sector for NZ angel investors

More than half the investment made in early stage companies in New Zealand last year was in the software and services space (53.8%), followed by 17% in technology hardware and equipment.

“Technology is increasingly the engine of growth for all companies, regardless of size” explains PWC’s Anand Reddy.

“It’s no surprise that it’s these areas where the most activity is happening and where angel and early-stage investors are putting their energy. This reflects global trends too. Data generated by Crunchbase notes that the software and services remains the dominant sector for investment.”

Speaking personally, John O’Hara said that his own portfolio leant towards software generated ventures.

“I am particularly proud of Ask Nicely, which produces software for NPS (net promoter score) collection and analysis. This company has already generated tangible returns for a number of the early angel investors. The company is now scaling into the US, with the founder moving to Portland, Oregon in the last couple of months.

“New Zealanders have a knack for practical problem solution and we are increasingly seeing them turn this knack into compelling business opportunities,” said O’Hara.

Click here to find out more about how the startup sector is evolving, and where it’s heading next.

Click here to dive into the data about this asset class.

Please follow and like us:

Angels Tell the Truth: What Makes a New Company Fundable

There’s more than $100 billion dollars currently being invested annually by venture capitalists, private equity firms and angel investors. Why do some businesses get a piece of the action and others don’t? It comes down to the fundability of the company.

Entrepreneurs may think they have a great business idea, but investors may not see it that way. To learn why, entrepreneurs need to look at their business from the investor’s point of view. Just like the founder, investors are looking for a match made in heaven – when both company founder and investor make money in the end and all live happily ever after.

As an experienced angel investor, managing partner and CEO of Sofia Fund, here’s my advice – consider this the ultimate primer on demystifying the angel world.

Read more

Please follow and like us:

Debra Hall named New Zealand Arch Angel 2017

One of New Zealand’s most ardent angel investors, Debra Hall, has been awarded the Angel Association of New Zealand’s (AANZ) prestigious Arch Angel Award at the 10th Anniversary NZ Angel Summit on Waiheke Island.

The Arch Angel Award is the highest honour in New Zealand’s angel investment community, and recognises individuals who reflect the qualities of the best angel investors and who are champions for the endeavour.

The award recognises the significant amount of time and money angels contribute to startups and early-stage companies – and specifically to their founders and teams – to help them reach their potential while also recognising angels who make a significant difference to New Zealand’s startup ecosystem

Debra has made many investments in early-stage companies and been an investor director for a number of these ventures. She has held governance roles with Auckland-based IceAngels, the Angel Association itself and is currently an Advisory Board member for the first Chinese founded angel investment group, Zino Ventures. In 2015 Debra received IceAngels “William H Payne, Active Angel Award”.

AANZ Chair and 2015 Arch Angel recipient, Marcel van den Assum, says Debra imbues all the qualities of a top-notch angel.

“She is not only an active investor, contributing money and the deep expertise she has from scaling and selling her own market research company, but Debra also genuinely cares about the founders she backs, providing personal and practical advice which is a vital part of the more holistic role angel investors play,” he said.

Marcel, who worked with Debra during her time on the AANZ Council, said her contribution to the angel investment in New Zealand is marked.

“The passion and energy she brings is extraordinary, whether it’s developing and delivering a specialised course for aspiring directors of angel-backed companies, or on the boards of companies she’s backed, advising entrepreneurs, making deals happen by bringing people together or cajoling and gathering data on our community, Debra has made a very real impact and lifted the professionalism, profile and reputation of angel investment in New Zealand.”

Andy Hamilton, recipient of the 2011 award, has known Debra since she began angel investing in 2007 and said she had been a dedicated and invaluable member of IceAngels, renowned not just for her deal making capability but also for the lively dinners she and her husband Peter have hosted over the years for dozens of international visitors.

Interviewed in Startup Young Company Finance Report’s October 2016 edition, Debra noted that she and Peter had heard about IceAngels through a connection who knew Andy Hamilton and subsequently received an introduction to the group.

“In those days, from the outside, it looked to me like a secret society,” Debra said. She subsequently discovered that wasn’t the case – “all angels are very welcoming of new members and in fact eager to get new angels on board,” she said.

“Peter and I invest together and we only invest in companies we both agree on. We’ve taken small and big investments across a diverse range of companies – from technical manufacturing, to biotech, to software businesses.”

It was in this article that Debra set out why she is so passionate about the role good governance plays in the success of angel-backed companies.

“Governance is often seen as an inconvenience or intrusion by founders, however an effective board is actually critical to their success. With many of these companies, we’re dealing with a team that has never run a business before, so experienced directors are not just bringing classic governance to the table, they’re bringing their contacts, business experience and willingness to take on risks – often for minimal remuneration,” Debra pointed out.

Debra received her award at the 10th Anniversary NZ Angel Summit, held at Cable Bay Winery on Waiheke Island and attended by 150 delegates. The annual event provides a hub for angels to learn and network, and is recognised as one of the world’s top angel events.

South African born, Debra was that country’s first female metallurgical engineer. After immigrating to New Zealand, her career changed tack when she took on a job for a market research company that allowed her to work from home. She found a passion for the sector, leading her to establish the market research company Research Solutions in 1992. It grew into one of the country’s leading market research consultancies, and was sold to global market research giant, Synovate in 2007. She chaired the New Zealand Marketing Association for a number of years.

Former Arch Angel winners also include The Warehouse founder and long-time angel investor Stephen Tindall; Andy Hamilton, chief executive of The Icehouse and member of IceAngels; US super angel Bill Payne; veteran angel investor Dr Ray Thomson; prolific AngelHQ member, Trevor Dickinson and current AANZ Chair, Marcel van den Assum.

–Ends–

For more information, please contact:

Suse Reynolds, AANZ executive director
mob: 021 490 974 or email: [email protected]

 

Marcel van den Assum, AANZ chair and 2015 Arch Angel
mob: 021 963 459 or email: [email protected]

 

The Angel Association of New Zealand (AANZ)
The Angel Association is an organisation that aims to increase the quantity, quality and success of angel investments in New Zealand and in doing so create a greater pool of capital for innovative start-up companies. It was established in 2008 to bring together New Zealand angels and early-stage funds. AANZ currently has 30 members representing over 700 individual angels associated with New Zealand’s key angel networks and funds. Recent NZVIF data revealed angels have invested more than $NZ484m in over 928 deals and 296 companies in the last 10 years. AANZ works closely with NZTE and Callaghan Innovation and a number of private sector partners including NZX, First NZ Capital, PWC, Avid Legal, AJ Park, KiwiNet, Uniservices and Spark Ventures. For more, please visit: www.angelassociation.co.nz

 

Please follow and like us:

Lead Partners

NZTE NZVIF PWC

Expert Partner

AVID “FNZC.jpg”

AANZ Summit Sponsors

Callaghan Innovation “UniServices” Kiwinet “Spark”