2017 Angel Summit focuses on next 10 years

The tenth Annual New Zealand Angel Summit will be held at Cable Bay Winery – Waiheke Island from 1 – 3 November 2017. It’s theme; “Doubling down on success… the next ten years!”

New Zealand is now decade in to formal angel investing in New Zealand and has amassed some impressive statistics for a nation of our size. Over $500m into nearly 1000 deals in the more formal part of our market. Ten years ago there were 4 clubs and 100 or so angels. Today there are 10 clubs and over 650 angels. All this activity has delivered hundreds of jobs and tens of millions of revenue. It’s this value creation we want to continue to accelerate.

Ten years ago there were 4 clubs and 100 or so angels. Today there are 10 clubs and over 650 angels. All this activity has delivered hundreds of jobs and tens of millions of revenue. It’s this value creation we want to continue to accelerate.

The 10th Annual NZ Angel Summit is being held back where it all started at Cable Bay Winery on Waiheke Island. The choice of the small intimate venue continues the deliberate approach by the Angel Association to ensure it creates the right atmosphere for relaxed and informal conversations between active angel investors. The last two summits have sold out and it unapologetically prioritises attendance for those who are ‘doing deals’.

On the first morning the Summit will celebrate our community of investors and founders and their achievements in the past decade. There is so much to be proud of. The rest of the event will be spent digging into what we need to do to double down on our successes based on stories and insights from New Zealand’s heroes. International speakers, carefully vetted for their ability to both understand New Zealand’s unique circumstances and our aspiration for outcomes and success are flying in to present.

Showcasing Angel Investor Backed Ventures

The Showcase event which kicks off the event will include up to 10 venture in three tiers; seed, first formal round, last raise with a clear exit path. Each group of ventures will be introduced by an experienced angel investor who will talk about the investment opportunity, the return profile, valuations and potential acquirers.

New Zealand Investor Keynotes

Key Note sessions will include deep insight into what we can be proud of and what’s next. Stalwart investors will share memories of getting started – what was their vision and what inspired them, their challenges and what we need to do in the next decade to ensure value is delivered. These sessions will explore why our environment looked as it did 10 years ago, how far we’ve come and how we build on what we’ve created and set the vision for the next 10 years.

International Angel Investors

International special guests include Justin Milano (Good Startups, San Francisco, USA) who will explore the role of fear in the early-stage space. A veteran of Silicon Valley, Mr Milano has worked with angels and entrepreneurs to use cutting edge psychology and neuroscience, including emotional intelligence skills to help entrepreneurs and angels create break-throughs and unlock potential. Ron Wiessman (Band of Angels, San Francisco, US) will deliver a dose of reality exploring the critical the role of capital strategy and how tough it can be to source and entice an acquirers.

Actionable Insights

The extensive programme includes gritty content which covers; building strategic value, actively managing your portfolio for returns, Government’s role – identifying the right policy levers, the role of NZ corporate venture, and deep dives into term sheets – how have they have evolved and what role do they play in venture success lead by AANZ Expert Partner, Avid Legal’s Bruno Bordignon. Insight into which industries and technologies are going to irrevocably disrupt markets in the coming decades and make the best investment opportunities round out the valuable programme.

Finally, the event will also include the presentation of Arch Angel Award and two inaugural awards “Contribution to the industry” and “Lead angel and best venture award” – celebrating a great angel/founder collaboration.

To book your seat (preference is given to active angel investors) click here.

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Capital Markets Report: Making it a bigger deal

There’s still a big gap in the market for traditional venture capital, with long lead-ins, writes James Penn.
The average transaction value in New Zealand’s venture and early stage capital sectors more than doubled from 2015 to 2016, according to a recently released report. However, concerns about the fragility of the sector remain.
The New Zealand Private Equity and Venture Capital Monitor, published by EY and NZVCA, paints a rosy picture for the venture and early stage sector, with growth of 47.7 per cent in the value of deals — which don’t include angel investments — compared with 2015.
Interestingly, despite this growth in total investment value, the number of transactions has declined. This has resulted in the average transaction value growing from $906,000 in 2015 to $1.85 million in 2016, suggesting a maturing of the sector.
A similar, albeit more moderate, story can be observed for angel investments.
A recent report by the New Zealand Venture Investment Fund (NZVIF) stated that while the number of investments by angel groups and funds decreased 15 per cent, the total value of investment increased by 13 per cent, reaching $69m in 2016.
Willingness to invest larger sums in each individual company is indicative of investors having more confidence that those companies have strong, often international, growth potential.
However, this means that the sector is highly focused on growth capital — for companies that have already generated a significant level of revenue.
“A big gap remains in the market for more traditional venture capital targeted at businesses that have long lead times and deep intellectual property,” says Colin McKinnon, Executive Director of NZVCA. “We don’t have a New Zealand fund in the market at the moment that would be likely to invest in (say) Rocket Lab or 8i while they remain pre-revenue.”
Managing Partner of Movac, Phil McCaw, sees fragility in the early stage capital sector, arguing that New Zealand needs at least a couple more significant funds around the $150 million mark. Movac for its part recently raised $110 million for its Fund 4, and has already made a significant investment from that fund in retail software developer Vend.
“My vision for the venture industry is to see that we’ve got three or four long term sustainable funds that are $150 million type funds,” says McCaw. “We’ve got to find a way to lift this industry to get to that position.”
Engender Technologies, a Kiwi company that has developed laser technology to sort livestock sperm by sex, is illustrative of the benefits that come from these growth-focused capital sources.
After closing a $4.5 million capital raise — led by Kiwi venture investment firm Pacific Capital — in June last year, Engender has started growing its footprint globally. To date in 2017, Engender has announced a $1 million deal with Asia’s largest animal genetics company and has been named one of the five most innovative Agtech start-ups at Agfunder Global Innovation Awards.
The positive headline figures are also reflected in a flurry of activity among old and new specialised funds. In March this year, for example, NZVIF announced its 17th partnership for its seed co-investment fund with ArcAngels, a group of private individuals focused on investing in female-led start-ups.
Meanwhile, the NZ Super Fund broadened its scope of investments over the past year, with investment in funds that target a spectrum of companies, from early to late growth.
“New capital commitments for funds including Movac and Global from Day One were complemented by on-going fundraising by Punakaiki Fund,” says McKinnon, “Crowdfunding platforms Snowball Effect and Equitise, and the public listing of Powerhouse Ventures also raised capital.”
KiwiSaver is nowhere to be seen in venture or private equity which is disappointing.
Colin McKinnon
McCaw says “I’m more confident than I’ve ever been. There’s more cash in the market and there’s more opportunity, and I don’t see those things changing in the next few years.”
Despite this dynamism, there remains work to be done to foster a deep early stage and venture capital market that can
satisfy the needs of rapidly scalable ventures.
Public funds and institutional investors need to play a greater role. While the Super Fund has taken a step in this direction, it has taken some time and the industry would welcome other funds following suit.
“KiwiSaver is nowhere to be seen in venture or private equity which is disappointing. International investors prioritise larger markets,” explains McKinnon.
“Creating a framework that incentivises the early-stage growth market until a long-term track-record is developed should be considered. The industry is close, but not quite there yet.”
McCaw also sees a need for policy change in this regard, noting the success of recent Australian policy changes and the subsequent growth in their sector.
“If we want a growth economy that grows from entrepreneurship, you’ve actually got to put in place a policy framework that supports it across the spectrum,” says McCaw. “And I think there’s an absence of policy at the moment in the venture and growth capital class that is not enabling the scaling of funds.”
And the age-old question of returns still remains. Yet again, there was an absence of divestment within the venture and early stage capital sector in 2016.
According to the Capital Monitor, just one of the past six years has seen any divestment, and that was a mere $400,000. However, McCaw says this is the nature of the beast and the early stage capital sector is always expected to have long pay-off timelines.
“It is still a developing story. Around the world, that’s a story that takes 20 years to create, across a couple of fund iterations,” says McCaw. “But it’s coming.”
“You can kind of justify the growth that’s incurring inside of these companies, because there really is some really fast revenue growth occurring — so there’s definite signs that the industry is investing in things that are creating long term value.”
“The rate of return at the moment in terms of cash back is not fast enough,” accepts McCaw. “But it’s getting faster.”
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Opinion: The state of play for New Zealand’s venture capital industry

The question of the future of the NZ Venture Investment Fund is the trigger for one of the most important questions right now in New Zealand – how early stage venture capital in R&D, innovation and technology is funded and managed.
It goes beyond the question of NZVIF, which is a legacy institution and served a different purpose in the past. NZVIF is, in effect two institutions – an investor of the $50 million Seed Coinvestment Fund co-investing alongside angel investors to date in over 230 seed and VC stage companies and manager of 11 secondary stakes in established funds. It has a team of just five investment managers, which is small relative to the number of investments. Profit maximisation of these holdings for the government by the existing team is possible with many different options.

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I Slept With 65 VCs and Learned These Things

Our first suitor called us in the spring. They offered to pay for coffee. It was our first date. I had butterflies in my stomach. They promised they’d done this before and that I shouldn’t be nervous.

I could tell they were experienced. Their smile was soothing.

They looked me in the eyes. They wanted our pitch deck. “Do you use protection?” I asked. “No.” I knew it was dangerous doing it without protection. But it was so tempting. I was excited. I wanted to get in their portfolio. I couldn’t resist. So I took a deep breath and slipped the deck in. “Is it in yet?” I felt naked. I didn’t care. Maybe this was the one, I thought. Maybe they’ll actually call me back after this meeting. Maybe they’ll invest.

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A leading VC partner explains what’s missing from Australia’s tech startup scene

It’s been just over 100 days since I relocated back to Australia to join the incredible gang at Airtree Ventures.

I had previously worked with the London-based Summly until our acquisition by Yahoo (California based), and then as a venture investor at White Star Capital (New York and London based). As a result of these experiences, I was privileged to have an insider view on the growth of the London and New York tech communities.

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New Zealand’s biomedical sector to benefit from Australian Government initiative to make Australia a global leader in life science research commercialisation

Medical Research Commercialisation Fund (MRCF) creates fourth and largest fund
Wellington, 15th December, 2016 – The Australian Government’s launch of the AUD$500 million Biomedical Translation Fund (BTF) this week, an initiative to make Australia a global leader in the commercialisation of biomedical discoveries, will benefit New Zealand’s biomedical sector, says Dr Chris Nave, Managing Director of venture capital firm, Brandon Capital.
The BTF is a pool of public and private capital which will be managed by three venture capital fund managers who were announced this week. Brandon Capital has been allocated to manage the largest fund of AUD$230 million comprising AUD$115 million from the Commonwealth government matched with AUD$115 million from private investors.

The new fund, the MRCF BTF, is the fourth and largest investment fund of the Medical Research Commercialisation Fund (MRCF). Brandon Capital manages the MRCF, a unique collaboration between over 50 of New Zealand’s and Australia’s leading medical research institutes and research hospitals. These organisations contribute biomedical investment opportunities to MRCF funds as well as their expertise to support the development of these discoveries.

In April this year New Zealand joined the MRCF, enabling New Zealand research organisations to become members of the fund and seek investment support for emerging technologies from the third MRCF fund, MRCF3, an AU$200 million fund. Currently six New Zealand research institutes are members of the MRCF*.

“This is a bold and visionary initiative by the Australian Government to ensure Australia reaps the benefits from our world-class medical research,” says Dr Chris Nave, who is also Principal Executive of the MRCF.
“On all measures, Australia and New Zealand produce some of the world’s leading biomedical research, but unfortunately, too often, we see promising discoveries leave our shores early in development, with little value returned. The size of the MRCF BTF provides the opportunity for these technologies to be developed to much later stages in Australia, and in some cases through to the market and importantly patients, retaining greater value and leading to the creation of new jobs and income. The BTF program will be transformative for local industry, providing the ability for research discoveries to be developed from concept to commercialisation in Australia.”

While New Zealand member institutes will not be able to participate in the MRCF BTF, the new fund significantly deepens the pool of investment capital under management by the MRCF, with the advantages that brings to all members. Promising early stage medical discoveries from New Zealand member institutes can continue to seek investment from MRCF3 and follow-on funding.

Duncan Mackintosh, Brandon Capital New Zealand’s Investment Manager says the new fund means there is now AUD$430 million investment capital available for promising biomedical research, giving the MRCF real scale. “The MRCF is the largest life science investment fund in Australia and New Zealand by quite some margin. We are now competing at a global level and this will benefit our New Zealand investments by getting them greater attention internationally. It will also help us to attract offshore capital for New Zealand discoveries, attention from strategic partners and will mean we can attract and retain talent to run New Zealand investment companies.”

The BTF will see $250 million of Commonwealth government funding matched with private sector capital, creating $500 million for investments in companies with medical research projects at advanced pre-clinical, Phase I and Phase II stages of development.

The MRCF BTF private investors include CSL Limited, Australia’s largest and most successful biotechnology company, and the leading superannuation funds, AustralianSuper, Hesta, Statewide and HostPlus.

Brandon Capital is ranked as one of Australia’s top performing venture capital firms**. MRCF BTF will focus on supporting later stage opportunities, with the MRCF3 continuing to seed promising early-stage discoveries.

CSL Limited will be the only biopharmaceutical investor in the fund and will provide both investment capital and later-stage development and commercialisation expertise.
“CSL is a strong supporter of the need for a greater focus on translational research in Australia. The opportunity for the BTF to support the development of promising discoveries, onshore, is very exciting,” says Dr Andrew Cuthbertson, Head of Research and Development, CSL.

“The MRCF-BTF will not only have access to the pipeline of opportunities and capabilities of its member medical research organisations, it will also have access to the global medical research development capability and expertise of CSL,” says Dr Stephen Thompson, co-Managing Director at Brandon Capital.

It is anticipated the MRCF BTF will begin making its first investments in early 2017.

*New Zealand MRCF members: Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, University of Auckland; Institute for Innovation in Biotech, University of Auckland; Brain Health Research Centre, University of Otago; Malaghan Institute of Medical Research; Ferrier Research Institute, Victoria University of Wellington; Callaghan Innovation.

**In an Australian Financial Review ranking of Australia’s top performing venture capital and private equity funds (31 August 2016), Brandon Capital’s Brandon Biosciences Fund 1 was ranked second.

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Theresa Gattung Venture Capital fund

ArcAngels and Angel Association New Zealand today welcomed the launch of Theresa Gattung’s new Venture Capital fund which aims to raise capital from women, for women entrepreneurs.

“Boosting the pool of capital for entrepreneurs is vital for New Zealand’s ecosystem of start ups to grow,” said Cecilia Tarrant, Chair of ArcAngels, a New Zealand based angel organisation focused on funding women entrepreneurs.

“As an organisation, focused on women-founders, we are delighted to hear Theresa Gattung, one of New Zealand’s preeminent business leaders has launched an initiative to fund women entrepreneurs, supported by women. Having a Venture Capital fund will help expand the capital and mentorship female entrepreneurs need to develop their businesses,” Tarrant said.

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New Zealand’s need for growth capital

As early stage investors we need to start getting real about the wisdom of our backing early stage, high growth ventures without far more consideration being given to where we source follow-on growth capital.

Even if we only look at last year’s New Zealand Venture Investment Fund’s seed co-investment data where about $50million was invested in early stage companies, the growth capital required for this cohort of companies is likely to be 10x this figure. So we are talking about finding $500m.

This is not just a problem for the investors in these companies; it’s a problem we need to grapple with in partnership with the government and the institutional investment community. These high growth companies are the engines of our economic growth. We can’t afford to drop the ball.

The development of an innovation led economy is widely accepted to take place over three ten-year horizons. We are coming to the end of ‘horizon one’ where the focus has been on inputs. New Zealand has done well here. The number of startups, early stage investors and dollars being invested has trended upwards over this period.

In the second ten-year horizon we should start to see outcomes from these innovation led companies in the form of jobs, export and tax revenue. But to generate these outcomes and see the true benefit of this investment, we need growth capital. Only then will the third horizon truly deliver in the form of financial returns and recycled capital and ultimately higher standards of living.

As I’ve just mentioned, there is no shortage of deal flow. The quality of that deal flow is improving every year too. This is in large part due to Government support for initiatives such as the Lightning Lab and the investor-led Tech Incubators. It is also a result of work others have done to upskill our entrepreneurs and angel investors.

To date, angels and other early stage investors have been able to fund the early growth of the companies meeting their criteria. We have been investing in startup, high growth ventures in a targeted sense for about 8 years but the really exponential upswing in investment has taken place in the last 3-4 years.

Quite logically, there is therefore an increasing and pressing need for growth capital in New Zealand.

This is illustrated in the recently released NZVIF data showing most investment is into existing deals. Angels are having the stay the course longer and dip back in their pockets for capital it could be argued should be coming from deeper more experienced pockets.

We need to give credit to those venture capital firms raising funds to meet the need for growth capital such as Movac’s Fund 4, the $40m fund GD1 is working hard to raise and the $40m fund raised by Oriens Capital. But it is not enough.

Closing the “growth capital gap” is going to need New Zealand’s pension and other institutional funds to broaden their investment mandates to allocate at least 3-5% to the growth needs of our high growth, early stage companies. We must support work Immigration NZ is doing to inject capital from experienced high network migrants into these companies. We need to tap into our rural and regional wealth more effectively. We have therefore been delighted to see angel networks forming in Taranaki and Marlborough reflecting an increasing awareness that high growth, tech based companies can be the source of future jobs and social and economic wealth in the regions. The banks also need to come to the party.

There is a great deal at stake here. We can’t afford “a hands off, market forces will deliver” approach. If ever a NZ Inc approach was needed, it is now.

Marcel Van Den Assum
Chairman
Angel Association New Zealand

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Kiwi start-ups invited to pitch to Chinese Angel Investors

It can often be a struggle for New Zealand start-ups to find the right partners and raise finance that can turn a business idea into a reality. However, a unique gateway has now opened for Kiwi businesses to access angel investment, manufacturing and distribution opportunities in China.

New Zealand based company FunderTech.com has forged a relationship with a Chinese investor club with offices in Shanghai, Beijing, Shenzhen and Chengdu. The relationship provides the opportunity for 5-8 businesses a month from around the world to pitch in front of a selected group of 500-800 Chinese Angel Investors. Kiwi start-ups also get the opportunity to meet visiting venture capitalists who present at the summit each month.

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More women need to tell their investment stories

Successful women investors and entrepreneurs need to stand up and be counted if diversity is to be encouraged in the heavily male dominated field of private equity and leveraged transactions the 2016 New Zealand Private Equity & Venture Capital Association’s (NZVCA) Workshop on Women in Growth Capital was told (23rd May).

Chania Rodwell, director, Helmsman Capital, Sydney says: `We do have to drive recruitment to private equity. It can appear less attractive than some of the other alternatives open to female applicants. It helps if women working in the industry build recognition to break down the misconceptions and help others to see the opportunities.’

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AANZ Summit Sponsors

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