Multicore World 2019

About Multicore World
The 8th Multicore World, the most important high-tech conference in the Southern Hemisphere – held yearly in Wellington, and offer a 10% discount available until 1 February.

Known by the speakers as “the Davos of Tech”, Multicore World 2019 will be 12, 13, 14 February and feature global leaders in a limited audience event that provides the knowledge and strategies to future-proof your technological innovation.

Don’t just imagine the future: discuss it together with who is designing and building it!

Speakers from Intel, Arm, Facebook, Oracle, Broadcom as well as from the major US National Labs (Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Argonne, PNNL) and from Japan, Singapore, Netherlands, UK, and more converge every year at Multicore World to discuss at peer-level about next-gen computing and its applications to all fields.

Visit Multicore.World for full information about speakers, abstracts, schedule, tickets and venue.

Members of AANZ will benefit of a 10% discount using this link – valid only until Friday 1st February (unless sold out). Register NOW, there are only 90 tickets for sale!

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2018 New Zealand Hi-Tech Awards – Finalists Announced

A record number of people gathered across Auckland, Christchurch and Wellington today to hear the finalists in the 2018 NZ Hi-Tech Awards announced.

Entries this year have come in from right across the country and this is reflected in the line up of finalists this year, according to Jen Rutherford, Chair of the Hi-Tech Trust, who says the standard of entries is the highest ever seen in the history of the Awards.

“This year’s finalists span the full spectrum of the hi-tech sector and the country. For 2018 we have made a really big push to ensure even greater diversity across the board and it’s great to see so many areas of the country represented, as well as a huge increase in the number of finalists led by women. The number of finalists with female CEO’s has almost doubled year-on-year. Whilst we are not there yet, we are moving in the right direction. Our industry is truly in great shape,” says Rutherford

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Conscious Consumers raises $2m, sets sights on UK

In one of the biggest capital raises for a social enterprise in New Zealand ever, Conscious Consumers has attracted $2 million of investment for their upcoming launch into the United Kingdom. but what might it mean for the health of the industry?

Jamie Newth, from impact investment specialists Soul Capital, is a lead investor in the business, which connects ‘conscious’ consumers with ethical retailers. “It’s no surprise that this is one of the largest capital raises in history for a New Zealand social enterprise,” says Newth. “Internationally, ethical spending is on the rise, and home-grown companies like Conscious Consumers are well-placed to promote their product to a global audience. There has been a huge amount of interest from UK investors.”

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Wellington company Eight Wire wins contract to build government data-sharing platform

A Wellington start-up company has won a major contract to roll out a system that will share personal details of New Zealanders on a large scale.
Eight Wire secured a five-year contract to build a data exchange platform that will allow government agencies and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) to exchange information.
The firm will work with the social investment unit, which was set up to provide evidence-based information to agencies to help inform their investment plans. Prime Minister Bill English was instrumental in the establishment of the unit when he was Finance Minister.
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Tech incubator Powerhouse Ventures makes two new investments

ASX-listed Powerhouse Ventures has committed to invest up to $450,000 in a new ed-tech software company spun out of Victoria University’s Faculty of Education in Wellington in conjunction with Macleans College Auckland, as its share price languishes 30 Australian cents below its market debut last month.

The deal comes as it’s also about to announce its first ever investment into a spin-out from the University of Auckland – Objective Acuity, that has developed a revolutionary eye technology.

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Powerhouse makes first investment post-ASX listing

Christchurch-based Powerhouse Ventures has already made its first investment since listing on the ASX last week – taking a stake in a cancer diagnostic system.

It invested A$500,000 (NZ$514,880) in Ferronova’s system developed by Victoria University of Wellington and the University of South Australia.

Magnetic probes allow surgeons to more accurately assess the spread of cancer throughout the body.

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R9 Accelerator Demo Day – 2 June

It would be great if NZ angels could get along to the R9 Demo Day to show our support for the large swathe of public servants in our community who are also aspiring to innovate and create ventures which are disruptive and scaleable….

We’re excited to announce that R9 Accelerator is having its second Demo Day on Thursday 2 June from 2:30pm – If you’re interested in attending please email Edd Brooksbank.

You’ll have the opportunity to invest in teams who are pitching their innovative solutions to improve public service for business customers, meet the teams and find out how they could help you. You will also hear what our panel of experts have to say and know why the R9 Accelerator is important to businesses across New Zealand.

Event details

  • Thursday, 2 June 2016, doors open at 2:30pm for a 3pm start
  • The Embassy Theatre, Kent Terrace, Wellington
  • Presentations will finish by 5:30pm with light refreshments and an opportunity to meet the teams from 5:30pm onwards

Any questions, please email Edd Brooksbank.

More information on R9 Accelerator

R9 Accelerator is a real life example of making it Better for Business when interacting with government. The teams are each working on an opportunity to make it better for businesses to interact with government.

The R9 Accelerator is led by the Result 9 Better for Business programme and delivered by Creative HQ to power better public services to business customers.

The R9 Accelerator brings together teams of entrepreneurs, developers, private sector specialists and government experts to work on projects to help solve major pain points for New Zealand businesses and reduce their effort in dealing with government.

The process takes just 14 weeks to generate a customer-validated prototype – ready for further investment. It takes a learn-as-you-go, fail fast approach to develop and test new products and services.
One of the teams – CoHelix. Dan, Nicole, and Alex are helping businesses be compliant by improving the fieldstaff services from regulatory agencies. Find out about the other teams and what they’re working on.

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Video giant Vimeo picks Wellington startup Wipster for global partnership

Wellington startup Wipster has struck a partnership with United States technology giant Vimeo in a “David and Goliath” deal that could be worth many millions of dollars to the three year-old firm.

Vimeo will market Wipster’s software as a paid add-on to its video-sharing suite, promoting it to the 700,000 people who already pay to use the paid version of Vimeo’s app.

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Wipster video success in US triples revenue

From day one, the aim of Wipster was to be international, says its founder.

Now the cloud-based, collaborative video review platform boasts 40,000 users in 120 countries and its revenues are rapidly growing.

Former filmmaker Rollo Wenlock started the business as beta in 2013 and launched it at the end of 2014 with a team of creative media tech experts in Wellington.

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Lightning Lab accelerator programme increasing investment in 2016

An enthusiastic review of one of New Zealand’s most successful “angel food generators”

An accelerator programme which has helped startups raise millions of dollars in investment is sweetening its offer in 2016 to attract more entrepreneurs.

Founded by Wellington incubator Creative HQ, Lightning Lab is a business incubator which mentors digital startups over three months.

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A STQRY of our times: How a Kiwi start-up’s soaring valuation shows we may be entering an investment boom time

In this interesting article, angel-backed StQry, now called Area360, talks about raising capital in the US with observations from NZTE’s Quentin Quin and well known NZ angel, Chip Dawson.

Taking advantage of a US-tech sector awash with cash, Wellington-born start-up Area360 raises $5.5 million from US-based venture capitalists and opens its US headquarters.

“This is the best time to raise money ever,” Stewart Butterfield told the New York Times recently. Butterfield is CEO of Slack, an instant-message-based team communication company, whose valuation rose from $US1 billion to $US2.8 billion in little over a month early in 2015.

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Inside Wellington’s thriving startup scene

Rod Drury and Stefan Korn from Creative HQ promote Wellington as the place for startups, including a thriving angel community!

The land drives development

Wellington is surrounded by hills which limit urban sprawl and is built around a bay which is too cold to swim in most of the year. Rather than brave the icy wind which lashes the region, entrepreneurs instead prefer to build software indoors.

It’s a geography which Drury says smashes everyone together into a small area, creating a “petri dish” of talent and creativity.

Throw in a significant amount of buy-in from all levels of government and you’ve got yourself a tech community which can hold its own against some of the best in the world.
There are talent issues

However, it’s still a small city so recruiting talent, with the likes of Trade Me and Xero hoovering up all the bodies they can get their hands on, means the country is “shamelessly” recruiting Aussies to jump across the ditch and get involved, Wellington Councillor Jo Coughlin says.

Read more on www.businessinsider.com.au

 

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Seeing the light led to law career

A wonderful article on Enterprise Angels member, Murray Denyer who totally personifies what it means to be an angel investor.

MURRAY Denyer’s eureka moment came part way through his double major in commerce and law at Auckland University in the early 1990s.

Supported by a scholarship from a major accounting firm, he had been leaning towards a career as an accountant. Then he stumbled across a Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade recruitment presentation.

“I saw the light – it absolutely appealed to me,” said Mr Denyer, a partner with law firm Cooney Lees Morgan, chairman of Tauranga economic agency Priority One, and an active angel investor.

The prospect of an international career tapped into a travel bug developed as a teenager, when he and a mate headed off straight after finishing at Waitakere College for three months’ backpacking around Europe.

“It was a major formative experience that opened my eyes to the world and cemented my interest in languages,” he said.

Mr Denyer, who was born and brought up in West Auckland, where his father was a chemist and his mother a GP, now set his sights on a diplomatic career.

He refocused his degree on international law, graduating with a Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Law, and joined the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade’s 1993 graduate intake as a legal division policy officer.

A major highlight of his diplomatic career came while he was serving on a short-term posting with the New Zealand mission to the United Nations in 1994, when he was on hand to observe Nelson Mandela deliver his first speech as president of South Africa to the General Assembly.

Soon afterwards, he was posted to The Hague as second secretary, looking after New Zealand interests in The Netherlands and Scandinavia. His brief also included international organisations based in The Hague.

Mr Denyer said he was proud to have played a role in working on the New Zealand case brought in the International Court of Justice which eventually forced the French to stop nuclear testing at Mururoa.

A French speaker, he spent a lot of time travelling in southern France. His blue-blooded, Paris-trained, French diplomatic peers found the Francophone Kiwi’s ability to swear like a Marseilles sailor hilarious. “I’m a strong believer in encouraging children to learn languages,” said Mr Denyer.

It was in The Hague that he met his wife Lisa, an Australian-trained lawyer who was travelling in Europe. After a whirlwind romance, she ended her travels and started work at a Dutch bank in nearby Amsterdam.

In 1998, the couple returned to Wellington where he served as a senior legal adviser and worked on international trade law disputes, travelling frequently to the World Trade Organisation in Geneva.

But after almost eight years with MFAT, he decided it was time he entered private practice and joined Minter Ellison Rudd Watts in Wellington as a senior associate. He became a key member of the firm’s state-owned enterprises practice, and also gained broad corporate and commercial experience. In addition, he founded and developed a high-profile international trade law practice, with clients including Fonterra, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, the Ministry for Primary Industries and New Zealand Winegrowers.

It was that export experience which brought him to the attention of a headhunter seeking a new general counsel for kiwifruit export marketing company Zespri. Mr Denyer knew the company well, but had never been to Tauranga, so he and his wife decided to check out Mount Maunganui.

“We left on one of those filthy cold Wellington days,” he said. “But when we got out in Tauranga it was 21 degrees and the sun was out.”

His wife, pregnant with their first child, took a walk on the Mount Maunganui beach while he interviewed for the job. By the time he returned, the decision to take the job and raise a family in Tauranga was a foregone conclusion for the couple.

“It’s paradise and we’ve never looked back,” he said.

Mr Denyer spent almost six years with Zespri, his role growing to include global management accountability for legal, government relations and industry regulation, and human resources, in addition to serving as secretary to the Zespri board. He was also deeply involved in the global licensing of kiwifruit varieties.

“It was enormously satisfying and incredibly busy, but towards the end I was doing a ridiculous amount of travel,” he said.

His wife had by then been working for some years with Cooney Lees Morgan, which advises Zespri, and he knew the team there well. In 2009 he came on board the firm as a consultant, and was elected to the partnership in 2010.

Mr Denyer works with the commercial practice group, servicing clients including large corporates like Zespri and Norske Skog, local government, Maori trusts and incorporations, and a wide range of small and medium-sized companies.

He has served as Priority One chairman for the past three years and praises the organisation for bringing the council and local business together to help plan the city’s economic development.

Priority One chief executive Andrew Coker said Mr Denyer had been a strong supporter of the agency’s s goals.

“As chair he’s made a major contribution to the organisation’s direction and it’s success,” said Mr Coker. “Murray’s strongly community-focused, and has been extremely generous with his legal and commercial expertise, as well as what is a precious commodity to him and his family, his time.”

Mr Denyer and fellow partner Paul Tustin are also closely involved in Cooney Lees Morgan’s advisory work for Tauranga’s Enterprise Angels, which invests in start-up companies.

Mr Tustin said his colleague was a very good lawyer who brought a valuable perspective to the firm from his corporate and diplomatic experience.

“Murray’s got a really good handle, at a governance level, on organisations, which has been very helpful as well,” said Mr Tustin.

As first published NZHerald 19 June 2015

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Twista Interview

 

TWISTA – an online radio station based in Australia – talks to Chris Twiss, of the New Zealand Venture Investment Fund. Then, Nick Sherwing and Jonah Merchant of BizDojo talk about creating a co-working space that helps startups in Auckland and Wellington thrive. Then visits the offices and factory floor of Auckland startup, StretchSense. What’s it like to be the first employee at a startup growing like mad?

Read more and listen the Twista interview here

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Leading angel set to impart wisdom

He’s been in NZ barely a week and John May is spreading the word about the power of angel investment. He’ll be in Tauranga this week and you can catch him in Wellington, Palmerston North and Christchurch over the next fortnight.

Tauranga investors interested in learning more about the angel investment space will get an opportunity later this month when American chair-emeritus of the Angel Capital Association John May visits the region.

“There are two ways of learning about angel investing ” by doing it and by hearing from people who have done it a lot,” said Bill Murphy, executive director of Enterprise Angels, the Bay of Plenty-based group which has become one of the largest and most active angel groups in New Zealand.

“Any of us who have been involved in EA for a while will tell you that the visits of people like Bill Payne and John Huston to EA have been critical in deepening our knowledge and making us better investors.”

The Angel Association of New Zealand is bringing Mr May out from the US.

Mr May has been at the forefront of the angel investor movement and is managing partner of the New Vantage Group, which has organised five angel investing organisations in Washington, D.C. placing funds into more than 50 companies.

In addition to having chaired the national US angel association, he is a lead instructor for the “Power of Angel Investing” seminars, a programme of the Angel Resource Institute.

He is also the co-author of two books, Every Business Needs an Angel and State of the Art: An Executive Briefing on Cutting-Edge Practices in American Angel Investing. Washingtonian Magazine named Mr May one of its 100 Tech Titans of DC, and he was awarded the Hans Severiens Award for the contributions to the angel investing industry at the Angel Capital Association Summit in San Francisco in 2010.

Currently, Mr May is active in cross-border angel investing and developing angel investment ecosystems in emerging markets.

He will speak at three events in Tauranga:

-A networking event from 5pm to 7pm on Thursday, 19 February, hosted by Enterprise Angels and Priority One, at the Ignition co-working space, Ground Floor, Rydal House, Grey Street.

-A half day workshop from 9am to 12pm on Monday, 23 February, at the BaseStation, Durham Street, hosted by Enterprise Angels

-An “angel at my table” event at Tauranga Art Gallery at 5pm on the Monday.

First published on nzherald.co.nz 12 February 2015

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More wonderful validation for angel-backed ShowGizmo rocking the event app space

A Wellington company’s “virtual goody bag” will be part of the actual goody bag at Australasia’s largest technology expo in May this year.

With more than 20,000 visitors from 30 countries expected to attend CeBIT in Sydney, SmartShow is gearing up for the next phase of expansion.

Read more

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Talent before ideas: incubator boss

First published in New Zealand Herald Thursday March 6, 2014

A blueprint for the next WhatsApp – sold to Facebook for a cool US$19 billion ($22.6 million) last month – would be a good start. A business plan for another Trade Me or Xero might be a beginning.

But according to entrepreneur-turned-investor Stefan Korn, a tech startup won’t get very far on an idea alone, however innovative that idea might be.

“Ideas are overrated,” he says. “Yes, you need a point of difference, but what you are really looking for is talent.”

Korn has been in the business of picking winning tech investments for a while now. Before taking over as chief executive of Wellington-based tech incubator Creative HQ last September, he founded several startups through WebFund, a private incubator he set up in 2007.

Incubators such as Creative HQ and WebFund provide startups with all the ingredients they need to grow – finance, expertise, contacts and resources – in exchange for a stake in the business and, less often, some heavily reduced advisory fees.

Increasingly popular, however, are accelerators, which work on a similar principle but over a far, far shorter timeframe and normally have a gaggle of angel, or early stage, investors who co-invest alongside the organisation once the startup’s been put through its paces and graduates.

New Zealand has one – Creative HQ’s Lightning Lab, which provides up to $18,000 in seed funding and aims to get a startup functioning and off on its own within three months in return for a stake of about 8 per cent.

The country needs incubators, accelerators, angel investors and venture capital firms to work together because that’s how the world’s tech hotspots such as Silicon Valley got where they are today, Korn says.

“They reinvest funds from earlier projects into new start-ups. Eventually it becomes a self-feeding mechanism, but it might take place over several decades. You have to take a long-term view.”

Since it was established in 2003, Creative HQ has helped more than 100 ventures, Korn says, but it turns away a lot more applicants than it takes on.

Potential candidates are assessed against an “evaluation matrix” with more than 20 different criteria. Innovation or the strength of the idea is just one aspect, Korn says.

“What’s more important are the background skills a team has. What insights into their business area or industry they bring, what networks they belong to and whether they can sell.”

The strength of the team is vital because at some point every startup will reach a critical point where it has to choose a way forward, change direction or focus on a particular area, Korn says.

“The team has to be able to make that decision when it happens. Otherwise all you’re left with is a great idea but not a viable business.”

According to Korn the investment climate in New Zealand compares well with other countries but sometimes the vision of local investors leaves something to be desired.

“New Zealand investors have usually made their money with traditional business models. They tend to have come from primary industries or property development so they don’t often ‘get’ how tech startups work.

“Traditional investors tend to look for indicators which make sense in their world. They might focus on the startup’s location or physical assets for example, which are irrelevant in our world.”

While New Zealand’s incubators and Lightening Lab accelerator educate eager startups, Korn hopes Creative HQ’s new investor boot camps, which are expected to start this year, will go a long way towards educating investors.

“The bootcamps will explain to investors what to look for in digital startups.

“We’ll cover things like what is involved in the due diligence process of early stage, high-growth ventures and what happens after the investment has been made; how to find out how the startup is doing, for example.”

Produced in conjunction with the Angel Association of New Zealand.

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Angels found, angels wanted

First published in the New Zealand Herald Friday October 11, 2013

Antony Dixon is bubbling with excitement. The chief executive of electronics-technology company Times-7 has just returned from Hong Kong, where the firm was named in the prestigious Red Herring Top 100 Asia awards.

The awards celebrate emerging technology companies from the Asia-Pacific region, so it was a big deal for a small company from New Zealand, says Dixon.

Even bigger, however, was what happened between the pitches and the handshakes. Dixon used the awards as an opportunity to visit his Asian contacts; confirming two new distributors in Hong Kong and Singapore and netting a new client in Japan in the process. “It was all really worthwhile, we got international recognition for our technology and we signed up a couple of new partners,” says an obviously delighted Dixon.

All this is a far cry from a year ago.

Times-7’s business is supplying equipment for the radio-frequency identification (RFID) or “smart tag” market.

Back then Dixon had been knocking on doors for almost a year trying to raise enough capital to develop and market the company’s new robust, slim-line antennas. His invitation to pitch at the 2012 Angel Summit – the annual gathering of the country’s angel investors (individuals who have a bit of spare cash to invest in tomorrow’s Kiwi companies) – was his last attempt to raise the $600,000 he badly needed.

“Before the summit we still didn’t have enough money on the table to make the [investment] round worthwhile. So we had to really put our best foot forward – which we did.”

Times-7 was one of 13 budding Kiwi companies asked to pitch at last year’s summit and one of six profiled by The Business last November.

It was one of the successful ones. Others were equally or even more successful; a couple, far less so. One is still trying to close the capital raising round it embarked on more than 18 months ago, making the Summit showcase a small part of what is now a long and arduous journey.

Even those who were successful, however, still have capital raising firmly on their agendas. That’s a fact of life for early-stage companies that doesn’t surprise Angel Association chairman and investor Ray Thomson.

“One of the problems with early-stage companies in New Zealand is they tend to run on the smell of an oily rag,” he says. “They don’t have enough capital to get themselves to market fast enough. It’s one of the major problems we have around commercialising Kiwi technology.”

Thomson says he encourages companies to raise as much as they can, whenever they can. Too many raise too little, slowing their potential progress and leaving them at risk of being overtaken by competitors or new developments.

Finding enough capital, however, is a problem Thomson shares with the companies. A key function of the association and its annual Summit is to encourage new angels to join the ranks and share their money, and the risks, with other angels in order to grow the total pool of money available to early-stage companies.

“That’s why we have the Summit in a different part of the country each year, to encourage more local interest.”

Last year’s Summit in Wellington, co-hosted by the local angel group Angel HQ, helped swell the capital’s angel numbers by 50 per cent, from 31 to 45. The association’s push to grow numbers also seems to be working across the country, with the official number of angels now at 420 compared with 368 this time last year.

Thomson and his association colleagues are beavering away on other initiatives in an effort to continue the momentum. A women-only angel group called Arc Angels is being launched this month in Auckland and Wellington. The group is the brainchild of Kiwi expat and staunch early-stage company supporter Bridget Liddell, now a senior partner with US investment company 212° Equity. Liddell is earmarked as chairwoman of the new group, and communications consultant Alex Mercer has been signed up as executive director.

Women-only angel investment groups are very successful in the US, says Thomson, especially at finding capital for businesses led by female entrepreneurs.

Golden Seeds, which started as a women-only group focusing primarily on women-run businesses, is now one of the largest and most active angel investment organisations in the States, investing US$58 million in 58 companies since 2005.

Thomson’s aim is to increase New Zealand angel numbers to more than 550 next year and he expects the Arc Angels to provide a significant chunk of that target.

There’s also a push to develop dedicated angel groups in some of the smaller centres, including Whangarei, Hamilton, Oamaru and Invercargill.

The latest Young Company Finance Index, produced by the Government’s NZ Venture Investment Fund, shows that angel investment increased 18 per cent to $36.5 million in the year to June, compared to $30.9 million in the year to June 2012. Cumulatively, $274 million has been invested in early-stage companies by angel investors since data was first recorded in 2006.

But Thomson says the numbers don’t reflect the true health of New Zealand’s angel sector, which is second only to the States, based on the number of angels per head of population.

“Twenty-three New Zealand angels went to the US Angel Summit this year. We were the largest country represented outside America, so there’s a huge amount of interest [in angel investing] here.”

This passion for angel investing is a large part of the reason why New Zealand can attract big international names to its Summit, says Thomson. “[International] angels like coming down here because this is one of the most vibrant angel communities in the world.”

This year the Summit’s line-up includes Canadian technology entrepreneur turned angel guru Basil Peters, a regular speaker on the US angel circuit and a strong advocate of early exits for angel investors. He is speaking for the first time outside North America, says Thomson. Others on the list include well known US angel and Kiwiphile Bill Payne; Singapore-based British angel investor Hugh Mason, who runs the emerging company accelerator JFDI Asia; and Stuart Fox, principal of one of Australia’s larger angel funds.

Driving best practice and angel numbers goes hand in hand, says Thomson. “It’s all about supporting the ecosystem. It’s no use the Government helping to build these little companies, and get the intellectual property out of our research organisations, if there’s no capital around to help them reach their targets.”

So how did our pick of companies from last year’s summit showcase go?

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If you would like to find out more about the 2014 Summit, please see AANZ Summit 2014.

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Lead Partners

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AANZ Summit Sponsors

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